News | February 25, 2009

RTOG Elects Full Member Principal Investigators Chair

February 25, 2009 – The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) has elected Elizabeth M. Gore, M.D. chair of the Full Member Principal Investigators Committee.

Dr. Gore is the RTOG principal investigator for the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, where she is an associate professor of radiation oncology. RTOG is a National Cancer Institute-funded national clinical trials group and is administered by the American College of Radiology.

“Dr. Gore is the principal investigator for one our most productive member institutions. She has been very active in RTOG research as a protocol chair and a member of our Lung Cancer Committee,” said Walter J. Curran, Jr., M.D., the RTOG Group Chair, and the Lawrence W. Davis Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology in the Emory School of Medicine and Chief Medical Officer of the Emory Winship Cancer Institute. “She has made significant contributions to the group’s research mission and, in recognition of her commitment, the RTOG leadership named Dr. Gore to our inaugural class of RTOG Next Generation Investigators last spring.”

“I am honored to be elected by my fellow full member principal investigators to this position,” said Dr. Gore. “The full member institutions are the backbone of the group, helping to define its scientific mission and responsible for the majority of its accrual. I plan to work closely with the RTOG leadership, the Membership Committee, and headquarters’ staff to address our concerns about accrual, data submission, and reimbursement issues. Our goal is to help the full members improve their RTOG experience which will hopefully translate into increased accrual enhancing the group’s ability to complete protocols quickly.”

As the chair of the RTOG Full Member Principal Investigators Committee, Dr. Gore will serve on the RTOG Executive and Steering Committees representing the interests of the full member institutions and she will also chair the RTOG Bylaws Committee. Dr. Gore is the first investigator elected to this newly created position.

The Medical College of Wisconsin has been an RTOG member for over 30 years. In addition to her research and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Gore practices at the Zablocki VA Medical Center –Milwaukee, a major hospital affiliate of the College.

Source: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the American College of Radiology (ACR)

For more information: www.acr.org

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