News | Radiology Business | August 26, 2019

RSNA Announces New Global Learning Centers Program

World’s largest radiological society will partner with radiology departments in low- or middle-income countries to improve radiology education and patient care worldwide

RSNA Announces New Global Learning Centers Program

August 26, 2019 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) is launching a new RSNA Global Learning Centers (GLC) program beginning in 2020. By partnering with established radiology departments based in low- or middle-income countries to create the learning centers, RSNA aims to improve radiology education and patient care around the world.

“The Global Learning Centers program offers a unique opportunity to develop a tailored education program, based on the specific needs and requirements of the host community,” said Umar Mahmood, M.D., Ph.D., RSNA board liaison for international affairs. “We will be able to tap into a wealth of RSNA resources and provide a team of dedicated volunteers to create a comprehensive, dynamic curriculum for the GLC.”

Over a three-year period, a team of RSNA members will work with the GLC to develop a customized educational plan including a curriculum with hands-on training, didactic lectures, conferences, online courses and other education offerings. Based on the needs of the applicant institution, equipment and technical assistance will also be provided.

It is anticipated that one GLC will be selected each year, with a maximum of three centers in operation simultaneously. RSNA is soliciting applications from radiology departments from eligible countries to apply to be a GLC and for RSNA members to join a team to work with GLC starting in 2020.

To be considered as a GLC, applicant institutions:

  • Must be a university or hospital;
  • Must be located in countries eligible to receive discounted RSNA dues;
  • Must demonstrate a need for radiology education and resources;
  • Must have an established radiology department (staffed with at least one radiologist); and
  • Must have a team lead who will serve as a primary contact with English fluency.

Eligible institutions can apply online. Applications to be a GLC beginning in 2020 will be accepted until Nov. 1, 2019. The RSNA Committee for International Radiology Education (CIRE) will review applications and communicate results in December 2019.

After a GLC is selected, a team of up to four RSNA volunteers will be selected, to match the needs of the GLC and serve a one-year term. One of the volunteers will be appointed as RSNA Program Director. The RSNA Program Director will serve a term of three years.

RSNA team members will travel up to twice yearly to the GLC to learn about the host site’s educational needs, and present lectures, hands‐on training and point‐of‐care opportunities.

The RSNA team, in close consultation with the local team, will design and present an educational plan, customized to the needs of the GLC, using RSNA educational resources.

For more information: www.rsna.org/glc

Related Content

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire)

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire).

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — GE Healthcare announced U.S.
Largest case series (n=30) to date yields high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting common findings in subset of children with positive CT findings

A and B, Unenhanced chest CT scans show minimal GGOs (right lower and left upper lobes) (arrows) and no consolidation. Only two lobes were affected, and CT findings were assigned CT severity score of 2. Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — An investigation published open-access in the ...
The paradox is that COVID-19 has manifested the critical need for exactly what the rules require: advancement of interoperability and digital online access to clinical data and imaging, at scale, for care coordination and infection control.

The paradox is that COVID-19 has manifested the critical need for exactly what the rules require: advancement of interoperability and digital online access to clinical data and imaging, at scale, for care coordination and infection control. Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020 | By Matthew A. Michela
One year after being proposed, federal rules to advance interoperability in healthcare and create easier access for p
The opportunity to converge the silos of data into a cross-functional analysis can provide immense value during the COVID-19 outbreak and in the future

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020 | By Jeff Vachon
In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic normal
United Imaging's uMR OMEGA is designed to provide greater access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the world’s first ultra-wide 75-cm bore 3T MRI.
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 27, 2020
May 27, 2020 — United Imaging's...
Off-site imaging companies are playing a key role in the fight against COVID-19
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 26, 2020 | By Sean Zahniser
After the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic has pas
There were several new developments in digital radiography (DR) technology at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. These trends included integration of artificial intelligence (AI) auto detection technologies, more durable glassless detector plates, and technologies to pull more diagnostic data out of X-ray imaging. Some vendors also have redesigned their DR systems to make them more user-friendly and ergonomic. 
Feature | Digital Radiography (DR) | May 26, 2020 | By Dave Fornell
There were several new developments in digital rad...