News | August 19, 2008

Radiosurgery Clinicians Present Latest Advances in Brain, Spine Treatments

August 20, 2008 – Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corp. said its Radionics XKnife clinicians presented their latest advances in the treatment of brain and spine tumors on Sunday, July 27 at the 50th annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in Houston.

Satish Jaywant, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ, presented his latest work using Radionics XKnife and ImageFusion software and cone beam CT to achieve stereotactic accuracy for extracranial targets.

Nilendu Gupta, M.D., associate professor and chief of clinical medical physics at James Cancer Center at the Ohio State Medical Center in Columbus, OH, presented his work in commissioning the Xknife system for stereotactic spine treatments.

Emilie Soisson, medical physicist and assistant researcher at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, presented her work on the Radionics InterFix system for intracranial stereotactic positioning for use on the TomoTherapy Hi – Art system.

Unlike conventional surgery, XKnife radiosurgery is completely noninvasive and does not require a surgical incision. Cancerous or other diseased tissue can be treated with focused radiation beams from a linear accelerator (linac) that are precisely guided using computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. Surrounding normal tissue is spared and patients are typically able to leave the hospital immediately after their treatment. To date, over 45,000 patients have undergone Radionics Xknife radiosurgery, said the company.

For more information: www.integra-LS.com

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