News | January 24, 2014

Radiation Before Surgery More Than Doubles Mesothelioma Survival

January 24, 2013 — Results of clinical research that treated mesothelioma with radiation before surgery show the three-year survival rate more than doubled for study participants afflicted with this deadly disease, compared to treating with surgery first.
 
The Journal of Thoracic Oncology published the findings, which chart a route to treat patients effectively and improve their quality of life and potential survival, said principal investigator and lead author John Cho, M.D., radiation oncologist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network (UHN). 
 
“The patients in our study experienced shorter treatment, fewer complications and speedier recovery,” Dr. Cho said. “The three-year survival rate more than doubled to 72 percent from 32 percent.” 
 
Mesothelioma is an aggressive malignancy that starts in the lining of the lung and progressively restricts and invades the whole organ. The study assessed Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy (SMART), which was completed over four years with 25 patients who underwent radiation therapy at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and surgery at Toronto General Hospital, both part of UHN.
 
Participants were treated with an accelerated, five-day course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a specialized technique that conforms the radiation dose around the tumors in 3-D while sparing the heart, spine and other healthy tissues. Patients’ affected lungs were removed the following week. 
 
The SMART approach reduced the treatment cycle for patients to one month from five months and reduced the risk of recurrence because radiation prevented the cancer from seeding elsewhere in the chest or abdomen during surgery.
 
Exposure to asbestos is the main cause of mesothelioma in the 500 new cases reported in Canada each year.
 
For more information: www.theprincessmargaret.ca, www.uhn.ca

Related Content

Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — An open-access Ameri
World's largest radiation oncology meeting will offer full conference on interactive platform October 25-28, 2020
News | ASTRO | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (...
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancers for more than a century and continues to be utilized in cancer treatment plans today. Since the introduction of radiotherapy, clinicians have been working tirelessly to further refine treatments to better target cancer.
Feature | Radiation Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Yves Archambault
Everything has room for improvement, right? Right. When it comes to cancer care, it is no different.
Proton therapy has evolved, and future predictions include smaller systems, more sophisticated proton dosimetry and devices that manipulate the proton beam
Feature | Proton Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Minesh Mehta, M.D.
The field of proton...
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosai

Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosaic pattern with a bronchocentric distribution to the GGO (white arrow, d) involving both central and peripheral lung parenchyma with pleural effusions (black small arrow, d). image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association wit