News | March 11, 2011

Physicians in India Show Intense Interest in Arc-Based Radiation Therapy

March 11, 2011 - The prospect of increasing radiation therapy treatment speed using dynamic, arc-based radiation therapy is capturing the imagination of Indian clinicians, if Vivek Mehta’s recent experience is any indication. Mehta, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Seattle’s Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI), gave three lectures on Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at the National Annual Conference of the Association of Radiation Oncologists of India (AROICON), which drew capacity attendance and provoked vibrant discussion among participants.

“VMAT is an emerging technique that is coming to India,” said Mehta, director, Center for Advanced Targeted Radiation Therapies. “Due to Swedish’s leadership in implementing VMAT, it was appealing to the AROICON committee to have us talk about it to their members.”

Mehta presented results from SCI’s first 100 patients treated with Elekta VMAT. One presentation was on nonstereotactic VMAT, one covered high-dose, hypofractionated VMAT using a stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) technique for lung tumors, and a third discussed general VMAT use. Many attendees were as interested in how VMAT compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on efficiencies of treatment speed.

"Clinicians asked whether VMAT is better than IMRT, in which clinical cases IMRT might be superior and what planning challenges VMAT may present," he said. “What made our presentation interesting was the actual proof from our center. For the first 100 patients treated, we ran a comparison IMRT plan. We could show how we did on conformality, speed and QA, and how many times we ended up using one, two or three arcs and how long each plan took to deliver based on the number of arcs.”

Mehta stressed that the first 100 VMAT patients actually represented the first 100 patients considered for VMAT, who also were candidates for IMRT. Both VMAT and IMRT plans were developed for these patients and the patient received either, based on the superiority of the plan as assessed by the physician.

“Out of those first 100 cases we looked at, 95 patients went on to receive VMAT,” Mehta notes. “The audiences were interested in the reasons why five percent of the patients had IMRT, and we were able to give them various reasons, such as the IMRT plan in a particular case gave a steeper dose fall-off near an organ-at-risk. The ‘take-home’ message was VMAT can replace the bulk of your IMRT and is efficient, but it doesn’t completely replace IMRT, which is okay because you still have IMRT.”

Another interest among Indian clinicians is related to resources.

“Ninety-five percent of patients in India pay for cancer treatment, so improving efficiency — treating more patients during a given day — enhances the clinic’s financial stability,” he said. “A technique such as VMAT SBRT is an enabler for them to treat these patients in a time-efficient manner without the capital outlay of a new machine.”

For more information: www.elekta.com.

Related Content

Accuray Launches Synchrony Motion Tracking and Correction Technology for Radixact System
Technology | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | April 24, 2019
Accuray announced the launch of its Synchrony motion tracking and correction technology to be used with the Radixact...
New Study Redefines Therapeutic Dose Guidelines for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
News | Lung Cancer | April 23, 2019
Non-small cell lung cancer is a common cancer for both men and women. Many people who are diagnosed with this type of...
Gamma Knife radiosurgery has become the preferred radiation therapy option for patients with brain tumors at facilities like the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, pictured here

Gamma Knife radiosurgery has become the preferred radiation therapy option for patients with brain tumors at facilities like the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, pictured here. The technology is favored largely for its ability to precisely target tumors while sparing healthy tissue.

Feature | Radiation Oncology | April 11, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Brain tumors are some of the most complicated forms of cancer to treat due to their extremely sensitive location.
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill. Interview with Mark Pankuch, Ph.D.

Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill.
 

Feature | April 02, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor and A.J. Connell
April 2, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology News (ITN) magazine w
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca