News | Ultrasound Imaging | March 30, 2018

Philips Integrates Reacts Tele-Ultrasound Platform on Lumify Portable Systems

Integrated tele-ultrasound solution enables remote collaboration and virtual training through face-to-face conversation along with simultaneous viewing of live ultrasound images and guided probe positioning

Philips Integrates Reacts Tele-Ultrasound Platform on Lumify Portable Systems

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

March 30, 2018 – Philips in partnership with Innovative Imaging Technologies (IIT) announced an industry-first integrated tele-ultrasound solution on Philips’ Lumify portable ultrasound system powered by IIT’s Reacts collaborative platform. This innovation connects clinicians around the globe in real time by turning a compatible smart device into an integrated tele-ultrasound solution, combining two-way audio-visual calls with live ultrasound streaming.

With this intuitive, easy-to-use integrated system, clinicians can begin their Reacts session with a face-to-face conversation on their Lumify ultrasound system. Users can switch to the front-facing camera on their smart device to show the position of the probe. They can then share the Lumify ultrasound stream, so both parties are simultaneously viewing the live ultrasound image and probe positioning, while discussing and interacting at the same time. In addition to clinicians seeking virtual guidance, Philips said the Lumify with Reacts is a valuable tool for teaching institutions, medical students and junior doctors, emergency medical service providers, disaster relief providers and hospitals with satellite clinics.

Lumify with Reacts can help advance patient care by bringing experts into an ultrasound exam anywhere in the world:

  • A professor can go on virtual ultrasound rounds with students, helping them learn anatomy and probe positioning quickly and efficiently, unrestricted by location;
  • A doctor can consult a colleague and receive expertise and guidance using live streaming ultrasound;
  • A midwife in in the community can call upon an obstetrician in a hospital or different location to receive perspective and guidance, discussing the ultrasound exam as if they were in the same room; and
  • An emergency medical technician in an ambulance can stream the live ultrasound exam and discuss a patient’s condition with an A&E physician, expediting care delivery upon arrival.

For more information: www.usa.philips.com

 

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