News | Ultrasound Imaging | March 30, 2018

Philips Integrates Reacts Tele-Ultrasound Platform on Lumify Portable Systems

Integrated tele-ultrasound solution enables remote collaboration and virtual training through face-to-face conversation along with simultaneous viewing of live ultrasound images and guided probe positioning

Philips Integrates Reacts Tele-Ultrasound Platform on Lumify Portable Systems

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

March 30, 2018 – Philips in partnership with Innovative Imaging Technologies (IIT) announced an industry-first integrated tele-ultrasound solution on Philips’ Lumify portable ultrasound system powered by IIT’s Reacts collaborative platform. This innovation connects clinicians around the globe in real time by turning a compatible smart device into an integrated tele-ultrasound solution, combining two-way audio-visual calls with live ultrasound streaming.

With this intuitive, easy-to-use integrated system, clinicians can begin their Reacts session with a face-to-face conversation on their Lumify ultrasound system. Users can switch to the front-facing camera on their smart device to show the position of the probe. They can then share the Lumify ultrasound stream, so both parties are simultaneously viewing the live ultrasound image and probe positioning, while discussing and interacting at the same time. In addition to clinicians seeking virtual guidance, Philips said the Lumify with Reacts is a valuable tool for teaching institutions, medical students and junior doctors, emergency medical service providers, disaster relief providers and hospitals with satellite clinics.

Lumify with Reacts can help advance patient care by bringing experts into an ultrasound exam anywhere in the world:

  • A professor can go on virtual ultrasound rounds with students, helping them learn anatomy and probe positioning quickly and efficiently, unrestricted by location;
  • A doctor can consult a colleague and receive expertise and guidance using live streaming ultrasound;
  • A midwife in in the community can call upon an obstetrician in a hospital or different location to receive perspective and guidance, discussing the ultrasound exam as if they were in the same room; and
  • An emergency medical technician in an ambulance can stream the live ultrasound exam and discuss a patient’s condition with an A&E physician, expediting care delivery upon arrival.

For more information: www.usa.philips.com

 

Related Content

A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
Visage announces cloud implementation, Visage 7 Workflow and semantic annotations
News | Enterprise Imaging | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — Visage Imaging, Inc.
Two leading organizations join forces to drive future telehealth strategies across hospital settings into the home propelled by COVID-19
News | Teleradiology | June 18, 2020
June 18, 2020 — Philips announced it has once again joined forces with the American Telemedicine Association (...
Diffusion tractography uses the movement of water molecules to identify tracts that connect different parts of the brain. It can be used to pinpoint the part of the thalamus to treat with focused ultrasound. Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center

Diffusion tractography uses the movement of water molecules to identify tracts that connect different parts of the brain. It can be used to pinpoint the part of the thalamus to treat with focused ultrasound. Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 15, 2020
June 15, 2020 — Recently developed magneti...
 Samsung announced the immediate availability of the RS85 Prestige, the latest addition to the company’s portfolio of ultrasound systems.
News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 11, 2020
June 11, 2020 — Samsung announced the immediate availability of the ...
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 09, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Although it is likely that existing ultrasound systems will be repurposed to treat COVID-19 patients, growth is still expected as companies plan to ramp up production. The ultrasound systems market will therefore outpace other diagnostic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Leading data and analytics company GlobalData forecasts the market will reach $6bn by 2028, but increased usage due to COVID-19 is anticipated have a tangible effect.
News | Ultrasound Imaging | June 05, 2020
June 5, 2020 — Although it is likely that existing...
The Philips Lumify point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system assessing a patient in the emergency room combined with telehealth to enable real-time collaboration with other physicians.

The Philips Lumify point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system assessing a patient in the emergency room combined with telehealth to enable real-time collaboration with other physicians.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020  — Philips Healthcare recently received 510(k) clearance from the U.S.