News | X-Ray | December 07, 2015

Philips Announces Expanded Indications for its SkyFlow X-ray Imaging Software at RSNA 2015

Advanced algorithm provides high-quality images of all anatomies for a grid-less workflow to enhance diagnostic confidence

A comparison between Philips SkyFlow gridless chest radiograph and the same image with standard processing.

December 7, 2015 — Philips debuted SkyFlow, an X-ray imaging software that produces high-contrast images for all anatomies in situations where clinicians decide not to use a grid, at the 2015 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA). SkyFlow is Philips’ first digital imaging solution providing grid-like contrast improvement and enhanced confidence for grid-less radiography, which improves clinician’s workflow and supports “first-time-right imaging” by decreasing the need for retakes due to misalignment.

SkyFlow is a proven technology for bedside chest exams and will be expanded to include other anatomies. The imaging software reduces the effect of scattered radiation by using an algorithm that requires no operator input and automatically adjusts contrast enhancement based on the amount of scatter, giving clinicians a crisper image to improve their diagnostic confidence.A study found that radiographers using SkyFlow technology in a grid-less workflow for chest exams saw an average of 34 seconds of time savings per examination compared to workflow with a grid SkyFlow can be used for all patient types, including bariatric cases.

“Philips understands the growing need of healthcare providers to increase cost savings while improving patient care,” Robert Cascella, executive vice president and CEO, Philips Imaging. “SkyFlow helps providers meet these challenges by simultaneously increasing productivity and patient comfort through shorter examination times and more comfortable positioning without a grid.”

High Quality Images, Improved Clinician Efficiency

Often radiographers face challenging work environments due to varying patient conditions, tight spaces in the exam room, and the tangle of tubes and cords to navigate. Clinicians often choose not to use a grid in imaging to save time related to grid alignment and ensure patient comfort. Historically, grid-less imaging resulted in scattered radiation, causing a significant loss of image contrast, making it difficult for radiologists to make an accurate diagnosis. However, grid-less workflow with SkyFlow technology provides grid-like image contrast and enables faster, less error-prone workflows than other non-grid options.

“With SkyFlow, our chest images which don’t use a grid are of a very high quality, and we look forward to seeing this enhancement used for other body parts and applications,” said John Berns, radiologic technologist, Sint Maartenskliniek Hospital, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare/solutions/radiography/radiography

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