News | January 12, 2011

PET Scans Provide Insight into Fever-Induced Epilepsy in Children

January 12, 2011 — Sudden, catastrophic childhood epilepsy is a parent’s worst nightmare, especially in the case of fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children (FIRES). While not much is known about the condition, new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine shows that positron emission tomography (PET) scans can offer an evaluation of cognitive dysfunction of FIRES, its evolution and further prognosis.

FIRES, a recently named condition, occurs in previously healthy children who, after a brief fever, experience acute seizures that are resistant to medication and last for several weeks. After the seizures stop, children are left with severe cognitive dysfunction, mainly involving language, memory and behavior. The study, “18F-FDG PET Reveals Frontotemporal Dysfunction in Children with Fever-Induced Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy,” was conducted with eight patients diagnosed with FIRES.

The patients were given a neuropsychologic evaluation, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and an 18F-FDG PET scan. Severe cognitive dysfunction was noted, and while the MRI tests showed no abnormalities for the patients, the PET scans reported significant cognitive impairment. Researchers compared the FIRES patients with a pseudo-control group of epilepsy patients with normal MRI and PET scan results. Using statistical parametric mapping, an objective approach to analyzing brain activity, the study exposed that the brain dysfunction was related to the epilepsy in the FIRES patients.

“The fact that the dysfunctional network is superimposed over the epileptic network is a strong argument that FIRES is the cause of cognitive deterioration in these previously normal children. Moreover, localizing such a dysfunction may help to specify the re-adaptation more accurately,” said Catherine Chiron, M.D., Ph.D., pediatric epileptologist and head of the Research Program on Epilepsy at Hospital Necker – Enfants Malades in Paris and one of the authors of the study.

She continued, “These findings may open the way for using 18F-FDG PET more extensively and more accurately in pediatric imaging, as this methodology allows us to investigate not only unilateral, but also bilateral diseases, and to interpret PET images in an objective and sensitive manner.”

Authors of the scientific article include: Michel Mazzuca, Olivier Dulac and Catherine Chiron, Inserm, U663 – University Paris Descartes, and APHP, Neuropediatric Department, Hospital Necker – Enfants Malades, Paris, France; Isabelle Jambaque, Lucie Hertz-Pannier, Viviane Bouilleret, Frederique Archambaud and Sebastian Rodrigo, Inserm, U663 – University Paris Descartes, Paris, France and Verne Caviness, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass.

For more information: www.snm.org

Related Content

RSNA Study Shows Real-Time Indicator Improves Mammographic Compression
News | Mammography | December 12, 2018
Sigmascreening recently announced that more than 100,000 women have had mammography exams with the Sensitive Sigma...
Youth Football Changes Nerve Fibers in Brain

Statistically significant clusters (red-colored) showing group differences (Control vs. Football) in white matter strain along the primary (F1) and secondary (F2) fibers. While body of corpus callosum (BBC) showed relative shrinkage in Football group, the other clusters showed relative stretching of fibers. PCR: Posterior Corona Radiata, PLIC: Posterior Limb of Internal Capsule, SCR: Superior Corona Radiata, SLF: Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus, SCC: Splenium of Corpus Callosum. Image courtesy of Kim et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football...
Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
News | Women's Health | November 29, 2018
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring may lead to earlier impairment of cardiac function in women than in men,...
Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRI

Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

News | Contrast Media | November 27, 2018
Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to reduce the dose of a contrast agent that may be left behind in...
Women Benefit From Mammography Screening Beyond Age 75
News | Mammography | November 26, 2018
Women age 75 years and older should continue to get screening mammograms because of the comparatively high incidence of...
Siemens Healthineers Showcases syngo Virtual Cockpit for More Flexible Workforce Management
News | Teleradiology | November 25, 2018
During the 104th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30...
Philips Launches IntelliSpace Discovery Research Platform at RSNA
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | November 20, 2018
Ahead of the 2018 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA), Nov. 25-30 in Chicago, Royal Philips...
Bay Labs and Northwestern Medicine Enroll First Patient in AI Echocardiography Study
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | November 19, 2018
Medical artificial intelligence (AI) company Bay Labs and Northwestern Medicine announced that the first patient has...
Immune Inflammatory Levels Linked to Disease-Free Survival in Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | November 19, 2018
Data from a validation study of a high-risk prostate cancer trial suggests that higher levels of pretreatment...
Life Image and Mendel.ai Bringing Artificial Intelligence to Clinical Trial Development
News | Artificial Intelligence | November 15, 2018
Life Image and Mendel.ai announced a new strategic partnership that will facilitate the adoption and enhancement of...