News | Artificial Intelligence | January 22, 2020

Oxipit Partners with HealthCare Konnect to Bring AI Diagnostics to Africa

The partnership aims to introduce vanguard AI diagnostic capabilities and improve detection of 75 pathologies

Medical imaging technology company Oxipit announced partnership with Swiss medical distribution company Healthcare Konnect to bring ChestEye AI imaging suite to healthcare institutions in Nigeria

January 22, 2020 — Medical imaging technology company Oxipit announced partnership with Swiss medical distribution company Healthcare Konnect to bring ChestEye AI imaging suite to healthcare institutions in Nigeria. The partnership aims to introduce vanguard AI diagnostic capabilities and improve detection of 75 pathologies, including tuberculosis, to one of the largest markets in Africa.

With over 200 million, Nigeria is the most populated country in Africa. Although in decline, tuberculosis still accounts for a disproportionate amount of deaths due to lack of timely and effective diagnosis, despite treatments for the disease being available. The Association of Radiologists of Nigeria (ARIN) has expressed concern over the shortage of radiologists with only 400 radiology specialists estimated for the entire population. 

"We are eager to support radiologists in improving diagnostics in both rural and heavily populated regions of Africa,” said Marwan Senhaji, managing director of HealthCare Konnect. “Oxipit ChestEye imaging suite will aid radiologists in their diagnostics workflow, reduce time per patient and will be beneficial in training of radiology specialists” added Nataniel Herzog, senior project manager for Nigeria. 

Oxipit ChestEye imaging suite encompasses a fully automatic computer aided diagnosis (CAD) platform which supports 75 radiological findings. The software generates a standardized preliminary text report that incorporates all the radiologically relevant information present in a chest X-ray image. ChestEye imaging suite also features a patient prioritization solution. By automatically arranging scans by urgency it reduces time-to-treatment for time sensitive conditions.

“We are excited to introduce AI capabilities of our imaging suite in Nigeria, where improvements in diagnostics can bring significant benefits for patient care. The productivity features of ChestEye imaging suite can lead to 30% time saved per patient and reduction in error-rate of up to 50%. In addition, the platform is instrumental in radiology resident training,” noted CEO of Oxipit Gediminas Peksys

Oxipit ChestEye was created to address the shortage of radiologist in developed and developing markets. In February ChestEye imaging suite received CE mark certification. Oxipit expertise in deep learning allows to adapt ChestEye imaging suite for diverse clinical settings. 

Recently Oxipit introduced AI X-ray longitudinal comparison. The dynamics enables a radiologist to compare X-rays and provide automatically generated reports specifically addressing the changes in images over the course of patient treatment. Oxipit is also developing ChestEye Quality - an automated clinical audit service for retrospective X-ray report analysis, and ChestEye Negative - a service to produce preliminary reports for chest X-ray images with no abnormality.

For more information: www.oxpit.ai

Related content:

A Glimpse Into Radiology in the Developing World in Africa

Oxipit Introduces Multilingual Support for ChestEye AI Imaging Suite

Oxipit to Showcase AI X-ray Longitudinal Comparison at RSNA

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