News | June 09, 2008

Novel Modular Design Promotes Flexibility, Expansion at University Of Chicago Medical Center

June 10, 2008 – The design of the University of Chicago Medical Center’s New Hospital Pavilion offers flexibility by basing the entire structure on an innovative grid system, a matrix of modular cubes, that can easily be reconfigured as needed to accommodate a range of uses, from inpatient beds to radiology suites to operating rooms, without changing the basic frame of the building.

The architects created that flexibility by using a basic grid system of modular cubes, each one 31.5 feet across and 18 feet high. The repeating modules, 102 on each floor, can be reconfigured as needed. The university said the goal of the design is to be extraordinarily flexible so redeployment and reequipping of space could be accomplished economically with minimal disruption to ongoing operations. Officials wanted a building that could be built and rebuilt over the coming decades to match the changes and advances in medicine.

The University of Chicago’s Board of Trustees gave final approval June 5 for New Hospital Pavilion. The futuristic, $700 million, 10-story, 1.2 million-square-foot New Hospital Pavilion, designed by architect Rafael Viñoly. It is hoped the flexibility of the building can be used to adapt to and drive forward rapid changes sweeping through medicine.

The pavilion will provide a new home for the University of Chicago Medical Center’s most distinguished clinical programs, those that provide complex specialty care with a focus on cancer, gastrointestinal disease, neuroscience, advanced surgery and high-technology medical imaging.

The Pavilion contains 240 private inpatient and intensive care beds; 24 state-of-the-art operating rooms; 12 rooms for gastrointestinal and pulmonary procedures; seven interventional radiology suites; and advanced diagnostic tools including high-resolution high-speed MRI and CT scanners. Major construction will begin in 2009 and the building will open in 2012.

Playing off of the traditional courtyard layout of much of the University of Chicago, the design includes a Sky Lobby on the seventh floor. It will have an elevated public space that breaks the building’s mass into two components, will contain central reception, family waiting areas, a chapel, gift shop, dining areas and other public spaces. Its floor to ceiling glass walls will provide expansive views of the campus and Lake Michigan to the east, Washington Park to the west, and the downtown Chicago skyline to the north.

The top three floors will each contain 80 private patient rooms, including 24 intensive care beds. The sixth floor will house 24 operating rooms, plus preoperative and recovery areas. The fifth floor will be devoted to diagnostic imaging and procedure areas, including interventional radiology, GI procedures, pulmonary/bronchoscopy areas, cardiac electrophysiology, plus patient preparatory and recovery areas. The third and fourth floors will initially be left as shell space, providing expansion room for developing programs.
Retail space, including a café, at the building's ground level will enhance the streetscape, and be open to the public. Maryland Avenue will pass through the building at ground level, serving as a convenient drop-off point. A green roof tops the building.

For more information: www.uchospitals.edu

Related Content

Report Finds Identifying Patients for Lung Cancer Screening Not So Simple
News | Lung Cancer | June 18, 2018
New findings in the current issue of The American Journal of Managed Care suggest that getting the right patients to...
Weight-Bearing CT International Study Group Hosts  Scientific Session at AOFAS Conference
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 15, 2018
June 15, 2018 —The Weight-Bearing CT International Study Group will host a scientific session on the benefits of weig
Florida Hospital First in State to Adopt NeuroLogica's BodyTom Elite CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2018
June 14, 2018 — NeuroLogica, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co.
Riverain Technologies Issued U.S. Patent for Vessel Suppression Technology
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2018
Riverain Technologies announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has awarded the company a...
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | June 14, 2018
This is a 360 degree image from the Canon Aquilion 64-slice...
American Society of Neuroradiology Honors Peter Chang with Cornelius G. Dyke Memorial Award
News | Neuro Imaging | June 13, 2018
Peter Chang, M.D., current neuroradiology fellow at UCSF and recently recruited co-director of the UCI Center for...
NewYork-Presbyterian Expands Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Fleet

Image courtesy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

News | Stroke | June 11, 2018
NewYork-Presbyterian, in collaboration with Weill Cornell Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the...
Latest additions to Somatom go. CT platform address advanced clinical fields and applications, including cardiology, CT-guided intervention and dual energy CT. How to lower radiation dose from Computed tomography scanners using ned technology.

Latest additions to Somatom go. CT platform address advanced clinical fields and applications, including cardiology, CT-guided intervention and dual energy CT.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 04, 2018 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Recent studies show a rapid increase in patient radiation exposure mainly due to increased use of medical imaging, pa
Lung Decision Precision
News | Lung Cancer | June 04, 2018
For smokers and former smokers, the threat of lung cancer always lurks in the shadows.
American Cancer Society Updates Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline
News | Colonoscopy Systems | May 30, 2018
An updated American Cancer Society guideline says colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 45 for people at...
Overlay Init