News | November 15, 2007

NightHawk to Show End-to-End Solutions for Radiologists at RSNA

November 16, 2007 - NightHawk Radiology Holdings Inc. today announced that it will offer its full range of services at RSNA 2007.

NightHawk will have representatives at RSNA to demonstrate its full range of services, including Preliminary and Off-Hours Interpretations, Final Interpretations3D Reconstruction and NightHawk Business Services.

Also featured will be NightHawk’s TALON Clinical Workflow System. This workflow technology solution reportedly features intelligent image distribution that routes images to, and creates work lists for, the appropriate radiologist by leveraging the speed and power of the internet in a secure fashion.

Designed by radiologists, for radiologists, the paperless system can quickly and easily integrate into an existing practice, tying multiple sites and systems together, eliminating administrative tasks and enabling radiologists to significantly improve their efficiency and load-balancing, according to NightHawk.

For more information: www.nighthawkrad.net

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