Technology | June 20, 2011

New SPECT System Addresses Need for Accessible Healthcare Technology at Low Dose

discovery

June 8, 2011 – GE Healthcare is offering a new fully upgradeable single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology that allows patient dose as low as 50 percent of those of standard nuclear medicine scanning protocols, or the potential for patients to spend significantly less time on the table during exams, all without compromising image quality.

The new GE Healthcare Discovery NM630 is engineered to help accommodate more patients than previous-generation GE nuclear medicine systems. With its large 28-inch (70 cm) wide bore and table capable of handling patients up to 500 pounds (227 kg), the Discovery NM630 provides access to a wide variety of patient sizes.

The more precise the information healthcare providers can get about a patient’s condition, the more effectively that patient can be treated. Elite NXT detectors are designed to offer good SPECT resolution and contrast for superb image quality, all to help clinicians diagnose patients earlier and more accurately. Ultra-thin design and auto-body contouring minimize the distance between the patient and the detectors for good resolution, while SPECT-optimized collimators and the high count rate enable precise event detection.

Evolution technology changes the relationship between time, dosage and image quality by allowing clinicians to reduce time or injected patient dose by up to 50 percent in most scanning procedures while maintaining image quality.

Discovery NM 630 ignites streamlined workflow by offering half-time imaging and fast and flexible robotic gantry motions to enable a whole body and SPECT bone protocol in 15 minutes.

The Discovery NM630 can be upgraded on location to a Discovery NM/CT 670 by adding computed tomography (CT) capabilities that can expand services to true hybrid imaging, helping to protect clinicians’ investment through the ability to expand diagnostic horizons as the practice requires and the care mission demands.

The advanced Xeleris workstation, which integrates new and existing nuclear medicine equipment, including legacy GE and non-GE devices, is designed to provide consistent results and enhanced workflow. Xeleris can keep clinicians connected to images and applications from picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) and PCs within their institution and remotely.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

 

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