Technology | June 20, 2011

New SPECT System Addresses Need for Accessible Healthcare Technology at Low Dose

discovery

June 8, 2011 – GE Healthcare is offering a new fully upgradeable single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology that allows patient dose as low as 50 percent of those of standard nuclear medicine scanning protocols, or the potential for patients to spend significantly less time on the table during exams, all without compromising image quality.

The new GE Healthcare Discovery NM630 is engineered to help accommodate more patients than previous-generation GE nuclear medicine systems. With its large 28-inch (70 cm) wide bore and table capable of handling patients up to 500 pounds (227 kg), the Discovery NM630 provides access to a wide variety of patient sizes.

The more precise the information healthcare providers can get about a patient’s condition, the more effectively that patient can be treated. Elite NXT detectors are designed to offer good SPECT resolution and contrast for superb image quality, all to help clinicians diagnose patients earlier and more accurately. Ultra-thin design and auto-body contouring minimize the distance between the patient and the detectors for good resolution, while SPECT-optimized collimators and the high count rate enable precise event detection.

Evolution technology changes the relationship between time, dosage and image quality by allowing clinicians to reduce time or injected patient dose by up to 50 percent in most scanning procedures while maintaining image quality.

Discovery NM 630 ignites streamlined workflow by offering half-time imaging and fast and flexible robotic gantry motions to enable a whole body and SPECT bone protocol in 15 minutes.

The Discovery NM630 can be upgraded on location to a Discovery NM/CT 670 by adding computed tomography (CT) capabilities that can expand services to true hybrid imaging, helping to protect clinicians’ investment through the ability to expand diagnostic horizons as the practice requires and the care mission demands.

The advanced Xeleris workstation, which integrates new and existing nuclear medicine equipment, including legacy GE and non-GE devices, is designed to provide consistent results and enhanced workflow. Xeleris can keep clinicians connected to images and applications from picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) and PCs within their institution and remotely.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

 

Related Content

GE Healthcare Recalls Millennium Nuclear Medicine Systems
News | Nuclear Imaging | November 15, 2018
GE Healthcare announced it is recalling its Millennium Nuclear Medicine Systems due to an incident in which the the top...
Artificial Intelligence Predicts Alzheimer's Years Before Diagnosis
News | Neuro Imaging | November 14, 2018
Artificial intelligence (AI) technology improves the ability of brain imaging to predict Alzheimer’s disease, according...
Researchers Awarded 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Grants
News | Radiology Imaging | November 13, 2018
The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research & Education (R&E) Foundation recently announced the...
Subtle Medical Showcases Artificial Intelligence for PET, MRI Scans at RSNA 2018
News | Artificial Intelligence | November 13, 2018
At the 2018 Radiological Society of North America annual meeting (RSNA 2018), Nov. 25-30 in Chicago, Subtle Medical...
University of Missouri Research Reactor First U.S. I-131 Supplier in 30 Years

MURR is the only supplier of I 131 in the United States and the first U.S. supplier since the 1980s. Image courtesy of University of Missouri

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | November 13, 2018
The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) recently shipped its first batch of Iodine-131 (I-131), a...
MEDraysintell Projects Increasing Mergers and Acquisitions in Nuclear Medicine
News | Nuclear Imaging | November 07, 2018
With the recent announcement by Novartis to acquire Endocyte , interest from the conventional pharmaceutical industry...
A PET/CT head and neck cancer scan.

A PET/CT head and neck cancer scan.

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | November 05, 2018 | By Sabyasachi Ghosh
“Experimental validation implemented in real-life situations and not theoretical claims exaggerating small advantages
PET Imaging Offers New Possibilities in Chronic Liver Disease Management

Hepatic 18F-FDG, 18F-FAC, and 18F-DFA accumulation are affected in a mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis. (A) Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of liver sections from vehicle- and ConA-treated mice. Scale bars represent 50 microns. Transverse PET/CT images (B) and quantification (C) of vehicle- and ConA-treated mice injected with 18F-FDG, 18F-FAC, and 18FDFA. Livers are outlined in a white dotted line. Quantification represents radiotracer accumulation in the liver normalized to a background organ. Image courtesy of Salas J.R., Chen B.Y., Wong A., et al.

News | PET Imaging | October 24, 2018
While liver biopsies are powerful and reliable, they are also invasive, painful, limited and subject to complications....
CORAR Supports Medicare Diagnostic Radiopharmaceutical Payment Equity Act of 2018
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | October 12, 2018
October 12, 2018 — The Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals Inc.