News | November 15, 2010

New SBRT System Offers Dynamic Tumor-Tracking

November 15, 2010 — The Vero stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) system offers dynamic tumor-tracking and advanced real-time imaging delivered with high mechanical accuracy. Its integration and precision dose delivery offer improvements in speed, accuracy and versatility.

Vero represents more than 20 years of research to combine intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and real-time tumor-tracking into one treatment delivery system. Introduced to the broad North American audience at ASTRO 2010, the annual meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Vero SBRT offers advanced imaging, treatment planning and delivery.

SBRT involves efficient delivery of precisely focused, high-energy radiation to a localized area to destroy tumors throughout the body that often cannot be addressed by conventional surgery, including malignant and benign lesions, especially for lung, liver, prostate, spine, head and neck, as well as many other extra-cranial indications.

“We have started clinically evaluating, designing clinical treatment protocols and conducting applied research at the University of Brussels, Belgium, and the first patient was treated recently,” explains Herbert Frosch, managing director for Vero GmbH. “This promising new system may offer better treatment results with fewer side effects compared to other cancer treatment methods, especially when it comes to the treatment of moving targets, like lung or liver tumors.”

Vero SBRT is a cooperative partnership between Brainlab AG and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. Brainlab develops the motion management and software technology. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. develops the MHI-TM2000 linear accelerator system capable of precise identification of tumor location and exact targeting of X-ray irradiation.

For more information: www.brainlab.com

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