News | October 11, 2010

New RTIS, RT PACS Launched in North America

October 11, 2010 — Two new radiation therapy (RT) image and information management solutions have been launched in the North American market to improve radiation oncology workflow.

Infinitt RT patient archiving and communications systems (PACS) and RTIS will integrate data from an array of sources and provide access to the data for planning, monitoring and facilitating all aspects of the radiation treatment process. Together, they computerize the complete workflow of radiation therapy, eliminating reliance on paper and film.

Infinitt RTIS and RT PACS have been implemented at two of the largest hospitals in Korea, Samsung Medical Center (nearly 2,000 patient beds) and Seoul National University Hospital (more than 1,600 patient beds). At both facilities, the solution has enabled their radiation oncology departments to save, search, display and integrate RT data, moving them toward paperless and filmless operations.

Source data consisting of the original computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) image; the anatomical structure set, including organ and tumor information; the RT plan parameters, annotations, dose information, and other RT images are stored in a centralized repository that makes the data readily accessible. In both hospitals, the Infinitt solution is integrated with Pinnacle and Eclipse treatment planning systems and an electronic medical record (EMR).

Infinitt RTIS computerizes patient registration, treatment course creation, simulation information management, treatment record management and scheduling. It includes medical notes, stores all planning data and supports automation of processes.

For more information: www.infinittna.com or www.infinitt.com

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