News | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | April 28, 2016

New Clinical Trial Applying SBRT to Partial Prostate Gland for Prostate Cancer

Treatment of targeted regions within the prostate in early-stage prostate cancer may increase treatment options and reduce side effects

prostate cancer, partial gland, SBRT, clinical trial, UH Hospitals

April 28, 2016 — Physicians at University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center (Cleveland) have started a clinical trial using a new form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to a specific area of a cancerous prostate instead of the entire gland.

The study, the first of its kind in the world, aims to determine if treating a targeted cancer region within the prostate in early-stage prostate cancer can increase treatment options and reduce the side effects of radiation. If successful, the trial could have a significant impact on the standard of care for men diagnosed with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer.

The trial’s first patient was enrolled and underwent therapy earlier this month without any side effects reported to date. The procedure was performed jointly by his urologist, Lee Ponsky, M.D., of the UH Urology Institute and a study co-investigator, and his radiation oncologist Rodney Ellis, M.D.

“Our hypothesis is that this method may offer a viable treatment option for men with early-stage prostate cancer before their cancer advances, while also minimizing or even eliminating life-changing side effects of treatment,” said Ellis, vice chairman, clinical affairs, radiation oncology, and UH Seidman Cancer Center, a co-investigator on the study. “We want to know if response and cure rates using focal radiotherapy within the prostate can achieve two goals: the first, to successfully eliminate localized malignancies when the disease is in extremely early stages, and second, to reduce the treatment’s impact on a patient’s quality of life.”

According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 80 percent of prostate cancer is identified in the early stages of development, when the lesions are localized within the prostate. Men diagnosed at this stage have two primary treatment options: active surveillance, where the patient simply undergoes regular monitoring, or whole gland therapy, with either surgery or targeted radiation therapy applied to the whole prostate. Due to the prostate’s close proximity to the bladder and the rectum, whole prostate radiotherapy, at the levels needed to eradicate malignancies, has a significant risk of causing side effects for men, including rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction.

For men who have a single lesion amenable to focal therapy, the trial offers a minimally invasive treatment completed in three sessions over a week using SBRT. The trial is designed to validate the patented methodology used in the study to select the target volume for partial prostate treatment. The investigators hope to limit side effects for surrounding tissue.

“Prostate cancer remains the sole malignancy where treatment is always delivered to the whole organ in routine practice,” said Mitchell Machtay, M.D., chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and principal investigator of the new study. “It is time to investigate new and better options for low-risk prostate cancer patients. Radiology advancements in ultrasound, CT [computed tomography] and MRI [magnetic resonance imaging] enable us to accurately identify, measure and target malignancies more precisely than ever before.”

The study will enroll 12 patients who will be selected using a patented methodology, owned by University Hospitals and developed in part by Ellis, who is also associate professor of radiation oncology at the School of Medicine.

Philips Medical Systems has licensed this technology and is supporting the study along with Elekta and Invivo.

For more information: www.uhhospitals.org

Related Content

An example of a body composition analysis of an abdominal CT slice with the subcutaneous fat in green, skeletal muscle red and visceral fat in yellow. This was automatically identified and analyzed via a deep learning algorithm to assess the risk for heart attack and stroke in more than 12,000 patients. #RSNA2020 #RSNA20 #RSNA

An example of a body composition analysis of an abdominal CT slice with the subcutaneous fat in green, skeletal muscle red and visceral fat in yellow. This was automatically identified and analyzed via a deep learning algorithm to assess the risk for heart attack and stroke in more than 12,000 patients.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | December 02, 2020
December 2, 2020 – Automated deep learning analysis of abdominal...
For men with early-stage prostate cancer, choices about initial treatment carry varying risks of "financial toxicity," reports a study in The Journal of Urology, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Getty Images

News | Prostate Cancer | December 02, 2020
December 2, 2020 — ...
 The study "Will We Solve Crimes with Radiomics? Results of an Experimental Study on Charred Human Bone Samples," was presented at the Virtual Radiological Society of North America's 2020 conference (RSNA20). Radiomics, which extracts data from clinical images, can be reliably used to assess changes in the bone structure due to fire exposure.
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | December 01, 2020
December 1, 2020 — The study "Will We Solve Crimes with Radiomics?
Chest CT images in a 34-year-old man with fever for 4 days. Positive result of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 using a swab sample was obtained on February 8, 2020. Dates of examination are shown on images. A, Chest CT scan with magnification of lesions in coronal and sagittal planes shows a nodule with reversed halo sign in left lower lobe (box) at the early stage of the pneumonia. B, Chest CT scans in different axial planes and coro

Chest CT images in a 34-year-old man with fever for 4 days. Positive result of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 using a swab sample was obtained on February 8, 2020. Dates of examination are shown on images. A, Chest CT scan with magnification of lesions in coronal and sagittal planes shows a nodule with reversed halo sign in left lower lobe (box) at the early stage of the pneumonia. B, Chest CT scans in different axial planes and coronal reconstruction show bilateral multifocal ground-glass opacities. The nodular opacity resolved.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | November 29, 2020
November 29, 2020 — The Radiological Society of North America (...
During active surveillance, prostate cancer is carefully monitored for signs of progression through regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, prostate exams, imaging, and repeat biopsies.

Getty Images

News | Prostate Cancer | November 18, 2020
November 18, 2020 — ...
Penn study supports the use of more testicular shielding for men and children during diagnostics

Getty Images

News | Radiology Imaging | November 16, 2020
November 16, 2020 — Early and repeated exposures to diagnostic imaging, such as X-rays and...