News | SPECT Imaging | June 21, 2018

New ASNC SPECT Imaging Guideline Addresses Advances in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

New guideline published by the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology provides an update to the 2010 ASNC SPECT guidelines

New ASNC SPECT Imaging Guideline Addresses Advances in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

June 21, 2018 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has published an update to its 2010 guidelines for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), with a focus on advances in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The 2018 guideline is designed to provide MPI guidelines for conventional and novel SPECT for all nuclear cardiology practitioners.

The new guideline — “ASNC Imaging Guidelines: Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Myocardial Perfusion Imaging—Instrumentation, Acquisition, Processing, and Interpretation” — features updates on novel hardware, collimators and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) scanners. The update also features brand-new sections on:

  • Reduced count density reconstruction techniques;
  • SPECT myocardial blood flow quantification;
  • Stress-first/stress-only imaging; and
  • Patient-centered myocardial perfusion imaging.

“Recent breakthroughs in SPECT technology enable, for the first time, exceedingly low radiation dose imaging, myocardial blood flow quantitation and personalized imaging protocols,” stated Sharmila Dorbala, M.D., MPH, FASNC, lead author of the guideline. “These advances have transformed SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging, as we know it. We hope that by standardizing the contemporary practice of SPECT MPI, these guidelines will ultimately benefit patients with heart disease.”

The guideline earned the endorsement of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), and is published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. The new SPECT guideline can be viewed here.

“It highlights very important advances in contemporary SPECT MPI while also providing guidance on best practices for performing high-quality, patient-centered imaging for optimal results that will have a meaningful impact on patient management and outcomes,” said Panithaya Chareonthaitawee, M.D., co-author and president of the SNMMI Cardiovascular Council. “The document will be an extremely valuable resource for members of ASNC, SNMMI and the nuclear cardiology community.”

For more information: www.asnc.org

Reference

Dorbala S., Ananthasubramaniam K., Armstrong I.S., et al. "Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Guidelines: Instrumentation, Acquisition, Processing, and Interpretation." Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12350-018-1283-y

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