News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 13, 2019

Netherlands Hospital to Install State-of-the-Art MRI Ablation Center

New center will feature a 1.5T MRI scanner and Imricor’s Advantage-MR EP Recorder/Stimulator System

Netherlands Hospital to Install State-of-the-Art MRI Ablation Center

May 13, 2019 — Imricor announced the signing of a commercial agreement with the Haga Hospital in The Hague, Netherlands to outfit a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ablation center for treating cardiac arrhythmias.

This advanced MRI ablation center will contain a 1.5T MRI scanner and Imricor’s Advantage-MR EP Recorder/Stimulator System. This installation will establish the Haga Hospital and Heart Center as a world leader in the field of interventional cardiac magnetic resonance (iCMR), according to Imricor, and place the hospital among the first heart centers in the world to clinically adopt MRI-guided cardiac ablations.

“At the Haga MRI ablation center, we will be focusing on treating patients with arrhythmias with a more focused individualized ablation treatment plan. Performing the ablation in the MRI will give us the ability to adjust to each individual patient and allow us to make and assess the ablation lesion,” said Vincent van Driel, M.D., director of electrophysiology at the Haga Heart Center. “This project has been the most collaborative effort between three entities (hospital, physicians and industry) that I have ever been a part of. The willingness to work together is one key reason why this is becoming possible here at Haga Hospital.”

Cardiac procedures guided by MRI provide physicians with sophisticated soft tissue visualization that allows them to individualize treatment strategies for each patient’s unique cardiac structure and substrate. They can also assess changes in tissue characteristics immediately post-ablation. These benefits have the potential to improve patient outcomes and provide safer, more cost-effective treatment — all in an environment that is free of radiation for both the patient and physician.

For more information: www.imricor.com

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