News | June 20, 2011

Near-Infrared Fluorescence Lights Up Hidden Blood Clots

June 7, 2011 — Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine's annual meeting showed a novel optical imaging technique called near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF), which can image dangerous blood clots hiding inside elusive veins. The imaging technique uses light energy with a newly synthesized imaging agent to glean information about cells and tissues. The agent uses a biomarker that seeks out fibrin peptide that is actively involved in the formation of clots.

“This new near-infrared fluorescence agent is important in the field of molecular imaging because it offers very high-resolution imaging capabilities and has high translational potential,” says Tetsuya Hara, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. “Specifically, the agent’s fibrin peptide has already been tested in Phase II clinical trials. The availability of a high-resolution fibrin sensor is important for two reasons: intravascular NIRF imaging of coronary-sized arteries is now possible, and coupling the fibrin peptide with this technique may allow researchers to study coronary artery plaques and stents, which could potentially help us identify patients at increased risk of heart attack.”

Near-infrared fluorescence targets tissues by hitting them with near-infrared light energy that is absorbed by fluorophores — components of a molecule that make it fluorescent — and then emitted at a longer wavelength (fluorescence). Researchers can detect fluorescence signals by studying the wavelengths of light energy that is released from the tissues. This method can be used to evaluate patients for a range of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as cardiovascular disease, like deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

In conjunction with the new near-infrared fluorescence fibrin-targeted peptide, investigators were able to successfully detect fibrin-rich deep vein thrombosis with both intravital fluorescence microscopy and noninvasive fluorescence molecular tomography, which allows researchers to acquire information about tissues by analyzing how light is absorbed by and scattered from tissues. By coupling the fibrin peptide agent (EP-2104R) with rapidly emerging intravascular NIRF imaging, researchers now have the opportunity to study micro-thrombi on coronary artery plaques and coronary stents that are at especially high risk for thrombosis and vessel occlusion, the main cause of heart attacks. This could help clinicians predict potential heart attacks and other major cardiovascular events before it is too late, thus potentially saving the lives of patients.

For more information: www.snm.org

Related Content

DOSIsoft Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Planet Onco Dose Software
Technology | Information Technology | June 20, 2019
DOSIsoft announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Planet...
Bay Labs Announces New Echocardiography Guidance Software Data at ASE 2019 Scientific Sessions
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 20, 2019
Bay Labs announced that new data on the company’s first-of-its-kind deep learning investigational guidance software...
United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Install of uMI 550 Digital PET/CT System
News | PET-CT | June 19, 2019
United Imaging announced the first U.S. clinical installation of the uMI 550 Digital positron emission tomography/...
LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 19, 2019
DiA Imaging Analysis announced the presentation of two studies assessing the performance and accuracy of the company's...
New Data Demonstrates Safety Profile of GammaTile Therapy for Various Brain Tumors
News | Brachytherapy Systems | June 18, 2019
GT Medical Technologies Inc. announced the presentation of clinical data from a prospective study of GammaTile Therapy...
Black Men Less Likely to Adopt Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
News | Prostate Cancer | June 17, 2019
A new study reveals black men are less likely than white men to adopt an active surveillance strategy for their...
International Working Group Releases New Multiple Myeloma Imaging Guidelines

X-ray images such as the one on the left fail to indicate many cases of advanced bone destruction caused by multiple myeloma, says the author of new guidelines on imaging for patients with myeloma and related disorders. Image courtesy of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 17, 2019
An International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has developed the first set of new recommendations in 10 years for...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019
BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for...
AI Biomarker Demonstrates High Predictive Power for Lung Cancer Immunotherapy
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 31, 2019
Lunit announced an abstract presentation of its artificial intelligence (AI) precision medicine research portfolio at...