News | Radiation Therapy | May 06, 2016

National Stereotactic Radiosurgery Patient Registry Gains Momentum

Brainlab data extraction technology facilitates streamlined patient data accrual at 11 hospitals across the U.S.

May 6, 2016 — Brainlab announced that it has enrolled 11 of the expected 30 hospitals and healthcare systems in the national Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) Patient Registry. Launched in partnership with The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the patient registry will gather important patient data, aiming to define national patterns of care in radiosurgery. The registry will have an eye to improving healthcare outcomes, supporting informed decision-making and potentially lowering the cost of care for patients.

To date, the SRS Patient Registry is gathering de-identified data on almost 400 patients at the diverse, high-volume enrolled facilities. The registry logs the de-identified SRS treatment information of patients affected by brain metastases, benign brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The SRS patient registry is set to prospectively collect data from 30 of the best hospitals in the United States over a three-year period, and under the banner of quality, generate a large clinical database.

“This level of detailed patient data analysis can change the way we look at methods and patterns of care from a both a population database and personalized medicine perspective,” said Brian Kavanagh, M.D., MPH, FASTRO, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colo. “The more patients we upload into the registry, the closer we can approach our ultimate goal of thoroughly understanding SRS best practices so that we can help improve patient outcomes.”

Brainlab, a major investor in and supporter of the SRS registry, transfers treatment and outcome information to the database through Quentry, a Web-based image sharing service, which employs advanced encryption and access-control technologies to ensure that all sensitive medical information is secure.

“Over the next two years, all 30 hospitals in the registry are expected to upload thousands more patients,” said Jason Sheehan, M.D., Ph.D., FACS, Harrison Distinguished Teaching Professor & Vice Chair, Department of Neurological Surgery University of Virginia Health System. “In an era of evidence-based medicine, this SRS Registry offers the potential to provide concrete guidelines and process benchmarks that could change patient outcomes on a global scale.”

Current sites providing patient data via Brainlab Quentry include:

  • University of Colorado Hospital;
  • University of Virginia Health System;
  • University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center;
  • Mayfield Clinic—University of Cincinnati;
  • Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience, Philadelphia;
  • Norton Cancer Institute, Louisville, Ky.;
  • Carolina Neurosurgery and Spine;
  • Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center;
  • Penn State Hershey Medical Center; and
  • Northwell Health (formerly North Shore LIJ), N.Y.

By the end of the summer, three additional facilities are set to begin uploading data to the SRS Patient Registry:

  • University of Utah, Huntsman Cancer Institute;
  • Yale New Haven Health System, Conn.; and
  • University of Rochester Medical Center, Strong Memorial Hospital, N.Y.

ASTRO and AANS lead the Scientific Advisory Committee charged with providing strategic oversight for the registry. Analysis of the de-identified patient data will be scientifically published, and the fully de-identified data elements will subsequently be made available in the public domain.

For more information: www.aans.org

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