Technology | Radiation Therapy | October 13, 2016

Nano-based Masks for More Comfortable Radiation Treatment Introduced at ASTRO 2016

Comparative testing shows nano composite reduces mask shrinkage, reducing force and increasing patient comfort

October 13, 2016 — At the 58th annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), Orfit Industries presented the new generation of nano-based masks.  

Compared to Efficast masks used for head and neck immobilization, immobilization masks made from nano-enhanced thermoplastic sheets provide the patient with more comfort through a lower degree of shrinkage, and therefore reduced pressure on the face during radiation therapy. The issue of mask tightness is a very common one, as medication received during the radiation treatment phase may result in an increase in the volume of the patient.

In its efforts to provide a higher degree of patient comfort, Orfit Industries developed a nano-based thermoplastic material that results in thinner masks with less shrinkage. Orfit engineers have interwoven a natural material (nano clay) in the inner layers of the thermoplastic material, which resulted in a substantial improvement of its mechanical properties. Thermoplastics will shrink when they cool on the patient during the mask making process and therefore have an impact on comfort, in particular when the volume of the patient tends to increase in the course of treatment. In this context, the reduction of shrinkage by means of NANOR is an important step forward as it provides the degree of comfort required to minimize patient movement during the delivery of the dose.

In a number of laboratory tests, the Orfit research team compared two low melting temperature thermoplastic materials, known under their commercial names NANOR and Efficast, both developed and manufactured by Orfit Industries. The results show a reduction of fixation force for NANOR, making patient immobilization easier and contributing to patient comfort and ultimately effectiveness of radiation therapy.

The Orfit tests also revealed that nano-reinforced thermoplastics have a higher bending modulus, i.e. the force for bending or deforming the material. The bending modulus of NANOR sheets is about two times higher than the bending modulus of Efficast sheets. Using NANOR allows for a reduction of the thickness of the immobilization masks to 1.2 and 1.6 mm instead of 2 and 3.2mm of Efficast, for identical mechanical properties of the immobilization mask. This in turn increases the patient’s comfort as the material conforms better to the anatomy.

The company has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its use of NANOR thermoplastic technology as of 2014.

For more information: www.orfit.com

Related Content

Siemens AG is continuing to rigorously execute its Vision 2020+ strategy and therefore expressly welcomes Siemens Healthineers AG’s acquisition of a 100 percent stake in Varian Medical Systems, Inc., a U.S. company active in the area of cancer research and therapy.

Getty Images

News | Radiology Business | August 03, 2020
August 3, 2020 — Siemens AG is continuing to rigorously execute its Vision 2020+ strategy and therefore expressly wel
JAMA Oncol. Published online  July 30, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.2783

Table 1. JAMA Oncol. Published online  July 30, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.2783

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 31, 2020
July 31, 2020 — An article published in JAMA...
It has been estimated that the overwhelming focus on COVID-19 could cause up to 35,000 excess cancer deaths in the UK during the next 12 months, and  Zegami, the Oxford University data visualization spin-out which has worked on several projects focused on the detection, diagnosis, or management of cancer, is calling for greater use of technology to speed up the process of diagnosis and treatment.

Getty Images

News | Radiation Oncology | July 29, 2020
July 29, 2020 — It has been estimated that the overwhelming focus on...
In I-131 cancer therapy, decay events damage sensitive DNA within a tumor cell nucleus, causing catastrophic single and double strand breaks. Clinical use of antibody-delivered Auger emitters could open a window for the targeted destruction of extracellular COVID-19 virions, decreasing the viral load during active infection and potentially easing the disease burden for a patient. View all figures from this study.  http://jnm.snmjournals.org/content/early/2020/07/16/jnumed.120.249748.full.pdf+html

In I-131 cancer therapy, decay events damage sensitive DNA within a tumor cell nucleus, causing catastrophic single and double strand breaks. Clinical use of antibody-delivered Auger emitters could open a window for the targeted destruction of extracellular COVID-19 virions, decreasing the viral load during active infection and potentially easing the disease burden for a patient. View all figures from this study.

 

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 22, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
July 22, 2020 — One of the first studies has been published that looks at the use of...
World's largest radiation oncology meeting will offer full conference on interactive platform October 25-28, 2020
News | ASTRO | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — Registration opens today for the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (...
Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancers for more than a century and continues to be utilized in cancer treatment plans today. Since the introduction of radiotherapy, clinicians have been working tirelessly to further refine treatments to better target cancer.
Feature | Radiation Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Yves Archambault
Everything has room for improvement, right? Right. When it comes to cancer care, it is no different.
Proton therapy has evolved, and future predictions include smaller systems, more sophisticated proton dosimetry and devices that manipulate the proton beam
Feature | Proton Therapy | July 06, 2020 | By Minesh Mehta, M.D.
The field of proton...