Technology | October 31, 2011

MRI-Compatible Display Aids Function MR Exams

October 31, 2011 – NordicNeuroLab (NNL), a developer of products for functional neuroimaging, announced the launch of its magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible liquid crystal display (LCD) display. Branded the NNL LCD Monitor, the monitor is intended for use in functional MR imaging, patient comfort and relaxation, and as procedural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) display.

In functional MRI (fMRI), a noninvasive MR procedure where a clinician is able to map out functional areas of the brain, the NNL LCD Monitor is used to present stimulus to the patient while they are inside the MR scanner. Alternatively, the monitor is used for patient comfort and relaxations for patients that are claustrophobic or anxious about getting an MR scan. Showing movies or calming nature scenes to patients while inside the MR scanner has shown to minimize child sedation and attenuate anxiety during scans, translating to larger patient throughput.

During interventional MRI procedures, the NNL LCD Monitor is used to guide the physician in surgical planning, aligning devices, navigating to target and monitoring procedures in real time. With NNL LCD Monitor, visual therapeutic guidance is easier than ever.

The NNL LCD Monitor has a slim design and a minimal footprint, a brilliant high definition 32-inch display and amazingly rich picture quality due to LED backlight technology. The monitor is the optimal alternative to a projector or goggle-based system that traditionally used in the MR environment.  The low weight and adjustable foot stand allows the monitor to be easily positioned in the preferred location in front or rear of the magnet bore.

For more information: www.nordicneurolab.com

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