News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 11, 2017

MR Solutions Showcases Multimodality MRI Solutions on Two Continents

Cryogen-free preclinical technology combines MRI with PET and SPECT for enhanced imaging

MR Solutions Showcases Multimodality MRI Solutions on Two Continents

October 11, 2017 — MR Solutions took their cryogen-free preclinical multimodality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) solutions on tour in September 2017. The company had exhibits at the 23rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (Sept. 11-13), and the British Nuclear Medicine Society’s autumn meeting (Sept. 15), both held in Liverpool. The company also exhibited at the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2017, Sept. 13-16 in Philadelphia.

MR Solutions, which is based in Guildford, U.K., is an independent developer and manufacturer of preclinical multimodality MRI technology and remains the only company to deliver a commercial cryogen-free 3T to 9.4T range of preclinical benchtop MRI scanners. In recognition of the company’s innovation and business acumen the company received the Queen’s Award for Enterprise twice – for innovation in 2016 and for international trade in 2017.

Multimodality imaging can provide researchers with one or more imaging techniques in parallel or in series for superior, quicker imaging results. To provide the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, MR Solutions has devised a system where the four gamma camera heads and focusing collimator can be easily clipped on to the front of the bore of the MRI scanner to provide state-of-the-art 3-D SPECT images. The SPECT images can be registered with the MRI images, providing anatomical-functional combined capability. The SPECT gamma camera can also be used independently.

The positron emission tomography (PET) capability is provided by solid-state detectors which are incorporated in the bore of the MRI scanner. The scanner combines the structural and functional characterization of tissue provided by MRI with the extreme sensitivity of PET imaging for metabolism and tracking of uniquely labelled cell types or cell receptors. This is particularly useful in oncology, cardiology and neurology research.

For more information: www.mrsolutions.com

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