News | May 20, 2008

MR Imaging Identifies Prostate Cancer Treatment Failure

May 21, 2008 - Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) along with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can accurately diagnose residual or recurrent prostate cancer in patients treated with high-intensity focused ultrasonic ablation, according to a recent study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

The study included 27 patients who had increased levels of prostate specific antigen after being treated with high-intensity focused ultrasonic (HIFU) ablation; 18 of these patients had local tumor progression seen at biopsy. DCE-MRI and DWI had about a 72 percent accuracy rate in determining which patients needed additional treatment because they had residual or recurrent cancer, said Chan Kyo Kim, M.D., lead author of the study. The study found that DWI had fewer false positives than DCE-MRI, but DCE-MRI had fewer false negatives.

"After HIFU ablation, the normal anatomy of the prostate gland is completely lost or deformed making it difficult to distinguish benign tissue from cancer," said Dr. Kim. The two imaging studies together, which can be done in about seven minutes, can overcome that challenge, he said.

HIFU is becoming more common as a prostate cancer treatment option, especially for patients who can't or don't want to undergo a radical prostatectomy, said Dr. Kim.

For more information: www.arrs.org

Related Content

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at ...
360 Photos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
This is a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI system installed at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas.
Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute Implements Philips Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MRI
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute announced the implementation of Philips’ Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR, the world’s...
Managing Architectural Distortion on Mammography Based on MR Enhancement
News | Mammography | May 15, 2019
High negative predictive values (NPV) in mammography architectural distortion (AD) without ultrasonographic (US)...
Netherlands Hospital to Install State-of-the-Art MRI Ablation Center
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 13, 2019
Imricor announced the signing of a commercial agreement with the Haga Hospital in The Hague, Netherlands to outfit a...
Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients
News | MRI Breast | May 09, 2019
When appropriate, short-interval follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify early-stage breast...
Clinical Trial Explores Opening Blood-Brain Barrier in Fight Against Alzheimer's

Vibhor Krishna, M.D., (right) fits David Shorr with a helmet-like device used in a new clinical trial for Alzheimer’s disease at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The device uses MRI-guided imaging to deliver focused ultrasound to specific areas of the brain to open the blood-brain barrier. Image courtesy of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | May 09, 2019
May 9, 2019 — A new clinical trial at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and two other sites is testing