Technology | June 11, 2007

MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Improves Treatment

Data released in a poster at the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) annual meeting show MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a more effective option for a broader population of uterine fibroid sufferers.

Phyllis Gee, M.D., presented the test results showing that women undergoing MRgFUS experience rapid and sustained relief from their condition and have a reduced need for alternative, invasive treatments in the future.

GE and InSightec reportedly developed the first MRgFUS system. InSightec’s ExAblate 2000 system works exclusively in combination with GE’s Signa MR system to noninvasively treat symptomatic uterine fibroids.

"These findings further underscore the utility of MRgFUS as a long-lasting, noninvasive option for the millions of women suffering from uterine fibroids,” said Dr. Gee.

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