News | February 27, 2014

Missouri Society of Radiologic Technologists Asks Legislators To Support Licensure Bill

Imaging CT Systems Missouri Society of Radiologic Technologists HB 1060

February 27, 2014 — Members of the Missouri Society of Radiologic Technologists met with lawmakers at the state capitol in Jefferson City, Mo. Feb. 12. They asked them to support House Bill 1060, a measure that will set licensing standards for personnel who perform certain radiologic procedures.

Sponsored by Rep. Galen Hidgon, HB 1060 requires radiologic technologists, assistants and practitioner assistants to secure a license with the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts. Currently, individuals in Missouri can perform medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures without taking a single course in medical radiation safety, patient positioning or basic radiologic science physics.

“Since the majority of radiologic procedures use ionizing radiation, which can be harmful to patients if administered improperly, it’s crucial that highly qualified, educated and licensed personnel perform medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures,” said Diane Hutton, B.A., R.T.(R), legislative activities chairman of the MoSRT. 

The MoSRT is proposing amendments to HB 1060 to include other medical imaging practice areas within the licensure scope, including radiation therapy. However, the society supports the bill in its current form because it serves as a platform to ensure that root standards are established.

“It’s important for patients to know that their radiologic technologists understand the core fundamentals of radiation safety, patient care and equipment operation,” Hutton said. “By establishing licensure standards, our state will show that we are putting Missourians first and are committed to providing patients with the best care possible.”

Missouri is one of only five states in the nation with no licensure or regulatory requirements for medical imaging and radiation therapy personnel.

The MoSRT works to advance the field of radiologic technology by assisting in establishing and maintaining high standards of education and training. It also pursues legislation that will require licensure for all personnel who use ionizing radiation for medical diagnosis and treatment of humans. The MoSRT’s efforts may result in an elevated quality of safe patient care and increased accuracy in diagnostic information for radiologist interpretation.

For more information: www.mosrt.org

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