Technology | June 30, 2014

Marz Universal Viewer Enhances Medical Image Access With Release 8.2

June 30, 2014 — The Web-based Marz Universal Viewer gives medical providers easy, unlimited access to imaging and patient data in many different formats, including DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine), and non-DICOM. With the Marz vendor neutral archive (VNA), patient data is accessible remotely through a Web browser or an image enabled EMR (electronic medical records). In its latest release, Version 8.2, the viewer has been improved with several features such as touch screen gestures, pen annotations and a magnifying glass. These additions allow for more accurate and complete readings performed on a mobile device. Further enhancements to the Web browser include lab comparisons, automatic cine and the RapidView algorithm. RapidView sets the Marz Universal Viewer apart from the market by loading images faster and more efficiently over the Web, improving usability and increasing the efficiency of physicians and radiologists reading or viewing remotely.

Marz Universal Viewer 8.2 also provides automatic comparison studies on the radiology tab, improved functionality with the upload feature, higher security on information transfers, HLT capability and Patient CD import from the universal viewer. In addition to these new enhancements, the Marz Universal Viewer compiles and stores data by patient, creating a patient-centric listing of clinical content that can then be sorted by originating modality or imaging specialty. The patient browser provides a complete patient picture from a single access point allowing referring and specialty physicians alike immediate access to both DICOM and non-DICOM data for enhanced clinical collaboration.

For more information: www.novarad.net

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