News | April 23, 2014

Manhattan Diagnostic Radiology is First Freestanding Provider to Provide 3-D Mammography in Borough

April 23, 2014 — Manhattan Diagnostic Radiology (MDR), a wholly owned subsidiary of RadNet Inc., announced that 3-D mammography breast cancer screening is now available at its 66th Street location.

MDR is the first freestanding, full-service radiology provider in Manhattan to offer this 3-D technology. Also known as breast tomosynthesis, this newest software makes 2-D images from a 3D scan, an upgrade only recently approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Three-dimensional mammography will eventually allow for faster scan times and reduced radiation exposure.

Standard 2-D mammograms take two images of each breast, one horizontal and one vertical. With 3-D mammography, the X-ray machine swings in an arc, acquiring approximately 60 individual millimeter-thin section images. The radiologist then views these images on a high-resolution computer monitor.

"This new way of performing mammograms improves our ability to find cancers, particularly in women with dense breast tissue in whom a small malignancy can be difficult to detect. Already in our early experience with this technology, we have discovered unsuspected cancers, which I am convinced would not have been detected with 2-D mammography alone. Three-dimensional mammography also reduces the number of false positive findings, which cuts back on additional testing and reduces anxiety," said Melissa Scheer, M.D., breast-imaging specialist at MDR.

Since insurance does not yet cover the cost of 3-D mammography, there will be a charge for the procedure at MDR.

For more information: www.radnet.com

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