News | Brachytherapy Systems | October 21, 2015

Long-term Data Supports Xoft System for Early-Stage Breast, Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

iCAD presents series of clinical studies supporting electronic brachytherapy system for multiple applications at ASTRO 2015

iCAD, Xoft Axxent, electronic brachytherapy, eBx, clinical studies, ASTRO 2015, radiation therapy

Xoft Axxent image courtesy of iCAD Inc.

October 21, 2015 — iCAD Inc. presented updated clinical data, hosted in-booth clinician presentations and showcased the latest in radiation technology at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) meeting in San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 18-21, 2015.

At the meeting, Ajay Bhatnagar, M.D., and Parag Sanghvi, M.D., presented posters with updated data on the use of electronic brachytherapy (eBx) in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Their data reflect treatment with the Xoft System for a total of 342 patients with 466 NMSC lesions, resulting in excellent cosmesis and few recurrences, with a mean follow-up time of 16.5 months and 11.8 months, respectively.

Alam M. Nisar Syed, M.D., and Adam Dickler, M.D., also presented posters with data supporting use of the Xoft System for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Their data reflect treatment of 136 breast cancer lesions with the system, showing positive clinical results, excellent to good cosmesis, few recurrences and a low rate of low-grade adverse events.

Gary Proulx, M.D., medical director, Exeter Hospital Radiation Oncology, clinical associate professor, Massachusetts General Hospital, discussed his clinical experience with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and the Xoft System at the Xoft booth, where the system and its cervical applicator, now commercially available, were on display. Visitors also had an opportunity to see an investigational line of applicators for IORT, shown as works in progress, for the treatment of prostate, head/neck, abdominal and brain cancers, among others.

The Xoft System is an isotope-free radiation treatment that is U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared, CE marked and licensed in Canada for the treatment of cancer anywhere in the body. It utilizes a proprietary miniaturized X-ray as the radiation source that delivers precise treatment directly to cancerous areas while sparing healthy tissue and organs. The system requires only minimal shielding and therefore does not require room redesign or construction investment. Minimal shielding also allows medical personnel to remain in the room with the patient during treatment. The mobility of the system makes it easy to treat patients at multiple locations and to easily store the system when not in use.

For more information: www.icadmed.com, www.xoftinc.com

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