News | Enterprise Imaging | September 04, 2018

LifeImage LITE Application Expands Image Sharing Network to 1,500 Connected Hospitals

Application allows hospital referral sites to get up and running quickly for easy medical image exchange

LifeImage LITE Application Expands Image Sharing Network to 1,500 Connected Hospitals

September 4, 2018 — LifeImage announced that its recently launched application, LITE, has helped to dramatically increase interoperability in healthcare with more than 100 new hospital connections in only two months. LITE, which stands for lifeIMAGE Transfer Exchange, gives the company’s hospital customers the ability to offer this tool to their referral and coordination sites. There is no charge to sending sites to download the application.

LITE was developed for healthcare entities to quickly deploy and build networks without the traditional information technology (IT) burdens of building and sustaining a clinical information-sharing network.

Historically, building and sustaining an information exchange network in healthcare has been challenging. It is burdensome for IT departments to implement and maintain, complex to integrate into workflows, expensive, and difficult to meet proprietary and onerous vendor requirements. Too often, patients have the onus of being the courier to transporting images on CDs. With lifeIMAGE’s standards-based interoperability suite, customers do not need to program around proprietary requirements. They are not forced to learn and use additional user interfaces, as the company’s solutions are digitally integrated into streamlined workflows or existing user-interfaces.

The lifeIMAGE network orchestrates the flow of all clinical information between clinical sites globally. The company has facilitated the exchange of 7 billion image files, with each file often containing hundreds of individual diagnostic images.

For more information: www.lifeimage.com

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