News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 15, 2016

Just add water? New MRI Technique Shows Its Benefits

Stomach MRI images combined with functional fMRI of the brain activity have provided scientists new insight into how the brain listens to the stomach during eating

mri brain

Activation in the insula is increased when the stomach is distended more. Image courtesy of Authors: G CAMPS, R VEIT, M MARS, C DE GRAAF, P SMEETS

Stomach MRI images combined with functional fMRI of the brain activity have provided scientists new insight into how the brain listens to the stomach during eating. Research from Wageningen University in the Netherlands shows - for the first time - real time data of the brain, the stomach, and people's feelings of satiety measured simultaneously during a meal, in a study reported at the annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior in Porto, Portugal. The researchers collected data from 19 participants during two separate sessions with different consumption procedures and found that a simple change like drinking more water can alter messages from the stomach interpreted as fullness by the brain. This new research approach can be used to investigate the interplay between satiety feelings, volume of the stomach and activity in the brain.

In the experiment, participants drank a milk-shake on an empty stomach, which was followed by a small (50 mL) or large glass of water (350 mL). MRI images were used to see how the different amounts of water affected stretching of the stomach: the large glass of water doubled the stomach content compared to the small glass. Together with this larger volume subjects reported to have less hunger and felt fuller.

This novel approach - combining information obtained simultaneously from MRI images of the stomach, feelings reported by the subjects, and brain scans - can offer new insights which would otherwise have been unknown, for example that activation in a brain area called the mid-temporal gyrus seems is in some way influenced by the increased water load in this experiment. The Wageningen University scientists developed the combined MRI method as part of the European Nudge-it research project, which seeks to discover simple changes that promote healthier eating. They will use it to search for a brain signature that leads people to decide to stop eating, to determine how strategies like water with a meal can be effective at feeling fuller sooner.

"Combining these types of measurements is difficult, because MRI scanners are usually set-up to perform only one type of scan. We've been able to very quickly switch the scanner from one functionality to another to do this type of research" said Guido Camps, lead author of the study. "In conclusion, we've found that simply adding water increases stomach distension, curbs appetite in the short term and increases regional brain activity."

Related Content

RSNA Study Shows Real-Time Indicator Improves Mammographic Compression
News | Mammography | December 12, 2018
Sigmascreening recently announced that more than 100,000 women have had mammography exams with the Sensitive Sigma...
Youth Football Changes Nerve Fibers in Brain

Statistically significant clusters (red-colored) showing group differences (Control vs. Football) in white matter strain along the primary (F1) and secondary (F2) fibers. While body of corpus callosum (BBC) showed relative shrinkage in Football group, the other clusters showed relative stretching of fibers. PCR: Posterior Corona Radiata, PLIC: Posterior Limb of Internal Capsule, SCR: Superior Corona Radiata, SLF: Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus, SCC: Splenium of Corpus Callosum. Image courtesy of Kim et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts Magnetom Altea 1.5T MRI Scanner
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 06, 2018
During the 104th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30...
GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | December 05, 2018
GE Healthcare recently announced new applications and smart devices built on Edison – a platform that helps accelerate...
Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
News | Women's Health | November 29, 2018
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring may lead to earlier impairment of cardiac function in women than in men,...
Vital Showcases Enterprise Imaging Advances at RSNA 2018

Global Illumination from Vital Images

News | Enterprise Imaging | November 28, 2018
Vital, a Canon Group company, will highlight the latest additions to its enterprise imaging portfolio at the 2018...
Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRI

Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

News | Contrast Media | November 27, 2018
Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to reduce the dose of a contrast agent that may be left behind in...
Women Benefit From Mammography Screening Beyond Age 75
News | Mammography | November 26, 2018
Women age 75 years and older should continue to get screening mammograms because of the comparatively high incidence of...
Arterys Demonstrates AI Cloud-Based Medical Image Analysis Solutions at RSNA 2018
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | November 26, 2018
Medical imaging software company Arterys will demonstrate its wide-ranging suite of artificial intelligence (AI)-...
HeartVista Announces One Click Autonomous MRI Solution
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | November 25, 2018
HeartVista announced its artificial intelligence (AI)-driven, One-Click Autonomous MRI acquisition software for cardiac...