News | August 19, 2007

Johns Hopkins to Add Elekta Synergy S to Cancer Treatment Lineup

August 20, 2007 — The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine is adding an Elekta Synergy S system to its Leksell Gamma Knife capability. A Stereotactic Center of Excellence, Johns Hopkins aims to fight cancer with both intracranial and extracranial resources for whole-body cancer treatment with the addition of Elekta Synergy S this fall.

Elekta Synergy S integrates high-resolution beam shaping, precise target localization, organ motion control and 3D imaging into one package, taking stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy to a new level.

Theodore L. DeWeese, M.D., is Johns Hopkins professor of Radiation Oncology, Oncology and Urology and chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences. "Elekta Synergy S is an ideal complement to Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery," says Dr. DeWeese. "With it, we are expanding stereotactic radiosurgery to other parts of the anatomy besides the brain."

Elekta Synergy S is an image-guided robotic linear accelerator that combines integrated software-driven imaging abilities with powerful high-resolution radiation delivery. At Johns Hopkins' Kimmel Center, Elekta Synergy S will enable specialists to perform both stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy throughout the body, as well as, stereotactic radiosurgery on cranial tumors unsuitable for Gamma Knife surgery.

Elekta Synergy S provides Johns Hopkins with the two most important ingredients for improved patient outcomes: 2D and ultra low dose 3D image-guided accuracy and highly conformal beam shaping, according to manugacturer. This enables neurosurgeons at the Kimmel Center to use extremely precise stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy on small-field spinal tumors as well as paraspinal indications with larger field-size requirements.

For more information: www.elekta.com

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