News | November 01, 2013

ImageIQ and Cleveland Clinic Present Findings on Pitching Injuries and Shoulder Anatomy

Study May Help Assess Player Injury Risk

November 1, 2013 – Image IQ, Inc. announced that findings from an orthopedic clinical study conducted by ImageIQ and Cleveland Clinic show that professional baseball pitchers with lower degrees of dominant humeral torsion, or the degree of twisting of the long arm bone running from shoulder to elbow, are more prone to severe arm and shoulder injuries. These findings, published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, have the potential to allow players and teams to assess injury risk in the future, proactively work to prevent injuries, and make better-informed player personnel decisions.

Cleveland-based ImageIQ used custom-tailored 3-D clinical image and motion analysis software to quantitatively measure joint anatomy differences in the shoulders of 25 professional pitchers from computed tomography (CT) image data provided by Cleveland Clinic. The pitchers were followed for two years, and the study recorded the number of days missed from pitching activities as a measure of the severity and incidence of the players' injuries. The study also found a trend relating lower side-to-side torsion differences with more severe upper extremity injuries.

"We were excited to work with Cleveland Clinic to bring our unique approach to orthopedic image data analysis to bear on this study," ImageIQ CEO Tim Kulbago said. "As pitchers must strike a delicate balance between mobility and functional stability, these research findings help us better understand the connection between shoulder range-of-motion and the level of injury suffered by professional baseball players, and how to predict and protect against the most severe arm and shoulder injuries. As a member of Cleveland's biomedical community and a lifelong baseball fan, that's great news."

The study's Principal Investigator, Joshua Polster, staff radiologist in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology within the Cleveland Clinic's Imaging Institute, commented: "We found that simple measurements from standard image data sets were too limited to capture the complex interplay of 3-D anatomic structures that are involved in sports injuries and other orthopedic pathologies, and we needed a more sophisticated approach. This analysis produced meaningful and reliable data for sports medicine experts and professional athletes, and will hopefully help minimize pitching injuries in professional baseball."

This study was supported by grant funding from Major League Baseball (MLB).

For more information: www.Image-IQ.com

Related Content

Video Plus Brochure Helps Patients Make Lung Cancer Scan Decision

Image courtesy of the American Thoracic Society

News | Lung Cancer | April 19, 2019
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung...
FDA Clears GE's Deep Learning Image Reconstruction Engine
Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 19, 2019
GE Healthcare has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of its Deep Learning Image...
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill. Interview with Mark Pankuch, Ph.D.

Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill.
 

Feature | April 02, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor and A.J. Connell
April 2, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology News (ITN) magazine w
Johns Hopkins Medicine First in U.S. to Install Canon Medical's Aquilion Precision
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 26, 2019
March 26, 2019 — Johns Hopkins Medicine now has access to the first...
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
Researchers Use Radiomics to Predict Who Will Benefit from Chemotherapy
News | Radiomics | March 21, 2019
Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will...
HeartFlow Analysis Successfully Stratifies Heart Disease Patients at One Year
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | March 19, 2019
Late-breaking results confirm the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis enables...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica