News | May 27, 2007

Hospital Realizes Unexpected Benefits of Blueberry Juice in MRI Scanning

May 28, 2007 — St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver has adopted use of a new fluid for patients undergoing certain MRI procedures: blueberry juice. MRI supervisor Wayne Patola decided to act on research that has shown that blueberry juice (also, tea, pineapple juice and Kaopectate) given orally affects the way fluid in the stomach behaves during MRI imaging of the bile ducts, essentially hiding fluid from the image to allow for better visualization of the bile ducts.

“The [Radiology] department recently started using blueberry juice in this manner and has achieved good results,” said Patola. “Also, it’s nice to be giving patients something to drink that they actually enjoy! It turns out one of the patients was involved in the company that makes the brand of blueberry juice (TrueBlue) that the MRI department is using and was excited by the unusual application of the product.”

A study by the USDA ranks blueberries as No. 1 in antioxidants when compared to 40 other fruits and vegetables. In addition to fighting cancers and heart disease, studies have shown that blueberries also lower cholesterol, slow down the aging process and improve eyesight, coordination and balance.

For more information visit www.trueblueberry.com

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