News | Breast Imaging | August 03, 2020

Hologic Announces Back to Screening Campaign

Campaign offers women a chance to win attendance at a private, virtual performance by GRAMMY  Award-winning artist and breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow

Hologic, Inc. launched the Back to Screening campaign encouraging women to schedule their annual mammograms now that healthcare facilities across the nation are re-opening their doors following closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nine-time GRAMMY Award winner and breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow has served as the spokesperson for Hologic’s Genius 3D Mammography exam for nearly five years.

August 3, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. launched the Back to Screening campaign encouraging women to schedule their annual mammograms now that healthcare facilities across the nation are re-opening their doors following closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

At the start of the pandemic, many health officials, professional societies and patient advocacy groups released guidance urging women to delay routine mammograms. As a result, appointments for breast, cervical and colorectal screenings in March were down 86% to 94% compared to previous years. The National Cancer Institute recently predicted 10,000 more people in the United States will die in the next decade from breast or colorectal cancer because of delayed screening and treatment due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Breast imaging facilities have since begun accepting patients for routine mammograms, however, a recent survey conducted by Hologic found that 27% of compliant women plan to either skip or delay their mammogram in 2020.

“It is impossible to overstate the massive impact the COVID-19 pandemic continues to make on the health and well-being of the global population, especially when we consider the potential long-term implications of delayed or canceled preventive screenings, such as mammograms,” said Pete Valenti, Hologic’s Division President, Breast & Skeletal Health Solutions. “In response, breast health providers have gone to great lengths to establish protocols to ensure patient safety as women return to screening. As the world leader in mammography, Hologic is committed to doing our part by reminding women of the importance of re-scheduling their exams to detect breast cancer as early as possible, which could save lives.”

Hologic’s Back to Screening campaign features a landing page where visitors can sign up for a reminder to schedule their annual mammograms. In doing so, they will be given the opportunity to enter a sweepstakes to win tickets to a private, virtual performance by nine-time GRAMMY Award winner and breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow, who has served as the spokesperson for Hologic’s Genius 3D Mammography exam for nearly five years. The Genius exam is the only mammogram clinically proven and FDA approved as superior for all women, including those with dense breasts, compared to 2D mammography alone.

“When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, a routine mammogram caught my breast cancer early, and I am here – and healthy – today, because I made my health a priority and got screened,” said Crow. “It’s important to me to share my story so that other women will do the same, especially now, when so many facilities are opening their doors after shutting down at the start of the pandemic, and so many women need to get back on track.”

Women can visit BacktoScreening.com to complete an appointment reminder and enter the sweepstakes from August 3 through September 20, 2020. The private, virtual performance by Sheryl Crow will take place on Friday, October 2, 2020, to kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

For more information: www.Genius3DNearMe.com

 

How COVID Has Disrupted Screening Mammography and The Urgency to Resume Screenings:

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging — Interview with Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

Half of Breast Cancer Survivors Had Delays in Care Due to COVID-19

Insight on the Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Imaging

Delay in Breast Cancer Operations Appears Non Life-threatening for Early-stage Disease

A Slow Return to Normalcy in Breast Imaging

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