News | December 02, 2007

High Blood Pressure May Increase Effects of Alzheimer's

December 3, 2007 – A study presented at RSNA found that having hypertension, or high blood pressure, reduces blood flow in the brains of adults with Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers used arterial spin-labeled MRI, a noninvasive technique that requires no external contrast agent, which can measure blood flow in the brain, to image 68 older adults.

The patient group included 48 normal individuals, including 38 with hypertension and 10 without; 20 Alzheimer's patients, including 10 with hypertension and 10 without; and 20 adults with mild cognitive impairment, 10 with hypertension and 10 without. Mild cognitive impairment, which affects brain functions such as language, attention and reasoning, is a transition stage between normal aging deficits in the brain and greater levels of dementia.

"While hypertension is not a cause of Alzheimer's disease, our study shows that it is another hit on the brain that increases its vulnerability to the effects of the disease," said study co-author Cyrus Raji, scientist and M.D. and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh where the study was conducted.

MRI results showed that in all patient groups blood flow in the brain was substantially decreased in patients with hypertension compared to those without. Cerebral blood flow was lowest among the Alzheimer's patients with hypertension, but the normal group with hypertension showed significantly lower cerebral blood flow than the normal group without hypertension.

For more information: www.rsna.org

Related Content

Women With Coronary Artery Wall Thickness at Risk for Heart Disease
News | Cardiac Imaging | April 25, 2019
The thickness of the coronary artery wall as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an independent marker for...
Philips Unveils IntelliSpace Radiation Oncology at ESTRO 2019
News | Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | April 25, 2019
Philips announced IntelliSpace Radiation Oncology, an intelligent patient management solution to manage complexity,...
ITN Wins Jesse H. Neal Award for Best Technical Content
News | Radiology Business | April 24, 2019
April 24, 2019 — Imaging Technology News (ITN) was recently named the 2019 Jesse H.
Artificial Intelligence Performs As Well As Experienced Radiologists in Detecting Prostate Cancer
News | Artificial Intelligence | April 18, 2019
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system to...
A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images

A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images. The algorithm, described at the SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium, used “Deep Learning,“ a form of machine learning, which is a type of artificial intelligence. Graphic courtesy of Sarah Eskreis-Winkler, M.D.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | April 12, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The use of smart algorithms has the potential to make healthcare more efficient.
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
NIH Study of Brain Energy Patterns Provides New Insights into Alcohol Effects

NIH scientists present a new method for combining measures of brain activity (left) and glucose consumption (right) to study regional specialization and to better understand the effects of alcohol on the human brain. Image courtesy of Ehsan Shokri-Kojori, Ph.D., of NIAAA.

News | Neuro Imaging | March 22, 2019
March 22, 2019 — Assessing the patterns of energy use and neuronal activity simultaneously in the human brain improve