News | Breast Imaging | November 12, 2019

Geisinger Launches Digital Tool for Better Breast Care Management

Mammosphere allows women to request, store and share their breast health records, including previous mammograms, for timely and accurate breast care management

 Mammography doctor

November 12, 2019 — Geisinger has partnered with Life Image, a global network for sharing clinical and imaging data, to offer a first-of-its-kind innovative digital tool that allows women to request, store and share their breast health records, including previous mammograms, for timely and accurate breast care management. 

Access to previous mammograms is critical for early detection of breast cancer. Patients without access to previous mammograms are likely to undergo more testing, and cancer detection may be delayed. 

This initiative that is supported by a Pennsylvania Department of Health grant awarded to KeyHIE through the Pennsylvania Patient and Provider Network aims to support interoperability of health information including diagnostic images to enhance the quality of patient care. Founded in 2005 by Geisinger, KeyHIE is one of the oldest and largest health information exchanges in the United States. It serves over 5.8 million patients over a large geographical area including Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

"Mammosphere provides a resource for both patients and providers to easily share breast health images and exams. Mammosphere is secure and HIPAA-compliant and helps to reduce the burden on new patients of having to track down and gather their breast health history in advance of an appointment. With access to patient mammogram history, providers will have everything needed to provide a fast and definitive interpretation of the mammogram,” said Joe Fisne, Associate Chief Information Officer of Geisinger.  

“Partnering with Geisinger is an exciting opportunity for us to collaborate with such a progressive institution and work together towards our shared goal of exceeding patient expectations and providing superior care,” said Matthew A. Michela, President and CEO of Life Image

In addition to Mammosphere, Life Image and Geisinger are working to expand their collaboration into new areas of population health management, patient engagement and imaging.  

Mammosphere is designed specifically for patients and is intuitive and easy-to-use. 

For more information: www.lifeimage.com

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