Technology | October 20, 2011

GE Healthcare Highlights Latest Nuclear Imaging Technology at RSNA 2011

GE Healthcare looks to the future of molecular imaging through improving cost, quality and access by helping clinicians deliver responsible care, both clinically and economically. This includes a focus on positron emission tomography (PET) treatment assessment, reinforced by a portfolio of quantitative imaging tools to help clinicians detect, diagnose and monitor disease earlier, and to evaluate cancer treatment efficacy more quickly.

GE Healthcare has created Q.Suite, a collection of next-generation capabilities designed to further quantitative PET by generating more, consistent standard uptake values readings — and enabling clinicians to assess treatment response more accurately than ever before.

In nuclear medicine, GE will showcase innovative and advanced technology, specifically the Discovery NM/CT 670, designed to improve workflow, dose management, and overall image quality.

The Discovery NM/CT 670 system combines a newly designed SPECT gantry and GE Healthcare’s latest advancements in nuclear medicine detectors with GE Healthcare’s BrightSpeed Elite 16 slice computed tomography (CT), resulting in shorten acquisition times and enabling more convenient patient scheduling in comparison to separate, conventional single photom emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT exams. With the Discovery NM/CT 670, the imaging time can be reduced from an average of 35 minutes to as little as 16 minutes. After a successful global launch, the system has been selected by 100 sites around the world. The new GE Healthcare Discovery NM630 is engineered to help accommodate more patients than previous generation GE nuclear medicine systems. With its wide bore and table capable of handling patients up to 500 pounds.

Brivo NM615 will make its global debut at RSNA. Brivo NM615, an advanced nuclear medicine gamma camera, is made possible through GE’s innovative Evolution technology. This single head system has the ability to achieve shortened scan times, rivaling a dual head system. Both Discovery systems include SPECT capability that gives doctors the ability to lower injected patient dose by as much as 50 percent of those of standard nuclear medicine scanning protocols, or the potential for patients to spend significantly less time on the table during exams, without compromising image quality.

Also to be showcased:

• Discovery MB750b, a molecular breast imaging system that may assist in assessment and early detection of breast cancer in women who are at high risk for the disease.

• Alcyone technology, adopted by more than 100 leading clinicians worldwide, has become an accepted technology for nuclear cardiology diagnosis. Harnessing four advanced nuclear imaging innovations, Alcyone technology has the ability to reduce scan time and/or injected dose while maintaining image quality. Alcyone technology is available on the Discovery NM 530c.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

 

Related Content

New ASNC SPECT Imaging Guideline Addresses Advances in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
News | SPECT Imaging | June 21, 2018
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has published an update to its 2010 guidelines for single photon...
FDA Clears New Imaging Functionalities for Biograph mCT PET/CT Systems
Technology | PET-CT | June 21, 2018
Siemens Healthineers will announce U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of four new system features for...
PET/CT Changes Care for 59 Percent of Suspected Recurrent Prostate Cancer Cases
News | Prostate Cancer | June 13, 2018
A recently presented investigational clinical trial evaluated the impact of 18F fluciclovine positron emission...
Nuclear imaging scan showing very good tissue delineation. Scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers.

Nuclear imaging scan showing very good tissue delineation. It offers crisp overall image quality and sharply delineates the muscle and fat planes, vertebral margins and end plates, billiary radicals, renal calyces, aortic wall and papillary muscles of the heart. Scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers.

Technology | PET-CT | June 05, 2018
June 5, 2018 — The U.S.
Emerging Trends in Nuclear Medicine
Feature | Nuclear Imaging | June 04, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Nuclear imaging and its various modalities have long played an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of numer
PET Imaging Agent Could Provide Early Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Coronal 18F-FEDAC PET/CT section of a mouse with collagen-induced arthritis. (A) On day 23 and day 37, increased uptake is noted in the front and hind paws of this mouse with collagen-induced arthritis. (B) Predictive performance of day 23 18F-FEDAC uptake for the development of clinical arthritis. ROC = receiver operating characteristic; Sn = sensitivity; Sp = specificity. Credit: Seoul National University and Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea

News | PET Imaging | May 17, 2018
A novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer developed by Korean researchers can visualize joint inflammation and...
PET Imaging Shows Protein Clumping May Contribute to Heart Failure Development
News | PET Imaging | May 11, 2018
A team led by Johns Hopkins University Researchers has discovered that protein clumps appear to accumulate in the...
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 09, 2018
Blue Earth Diagnostics signed an exclusive, worldwide agreement with Scintomics GmbH, Germany, a specialist in...
Cardiac MRI being performed at the DeBakey Heart Hospital.

Cardiac MRI being performed at the DeBakey Heart Hospital.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | May 03, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for cardiac assessment provides a radiation-free alternative to other commonly used...
Overlay Init