News | February 28, 2008

GE Healthcare Brings Mobile Computing to UCSF for Enhanced Vital Sign Collection

February 29, 2007 - GE Healthcare IT said this week it is collaborating with Intel Corp. and Motion Computing on a mobile computing solution to eliminate the manual collection of patient vital sign data, and it is slated for deployment at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center.

The goal is to provide nurses with a mobile, clinician-centric workflow that incorporates the Motion C5 mobile clinical assistant from Intel into vital sign collection using Centricity Enterprise in-patient electronic medical record (EMR) software and GE Healthcare's DINAMAP patient monitoring devices.

The solution replaces the use of computer on wheels (COWs) to access Centricity Enterprise EMR and is made possible by the creation of a new cable system and Java applet, which allows vital sign collection on GE DINAMAP monitors to flow directly into Centricity Enterprise. GE engineers also designed a new user interface optimized for navigation and data input using the Motion C5 pen and stylus capabilities.

Using Mobile Computing's formal clinician usability study methodology, UCSF piloted the mobile, clinician-centric workflow to fully utilize the potential of Centricity Enterprise EMR to help improve patient care. Initial benefits of the pilot have included enhanced patient interaction, reduced documentation delay and greater portability by the use of required clinical logins

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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