News | April 20, 2011

GE Healthcare Acquires Assets of Steady State MRI

April 20, 2011 – GE Healthcare has acquired the assets of Steady State Imaging (SSI), a Minneapolis-based company that develops magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. The terms of agreement were not disclosed.

Through this acquisition, GE Healthcare’s magnetic resonance imaging business expands its current advanced technology portfolio with the addition of the University of Minnesota’s SWIFT method, which allows the visualization of tendons, ligaments and other tissues not normally seen using conventional imaging methods. The SWIFT method has gained interest among MRI researchers for its potential for imaging in areas near the lungs and other parts of the body where conventional MRI is not typically effective.

"The acquisition of SSI is very much aligned with GE's healthymagination initiative to measurably reduce cost, improve quality and increase access to technology for more people," said Jim Davis, vice president and general manager of GE Healthcare's global MR business. "We are excited at the prospect of implementing SSI's technology and continue to invest in innovations that will have an impact on our customers and their patients.”

“We are delighted that our technology is now in the very capable hands of GE, a company with significant technical and marketing capabilities,” said SSI CEO, Danny Cunagin. “Our shareholders unanimously approved the sale and are very excited. We look forward to learning how our technology will be commercialized by GE in the future.”

“The fact that a startup company based on University of Minnesota technology is being acquired by an industry leader like GE Healthcare is tremendous news,” said Tim Mulcahy, vice president for research at the University of Minnesota. “This not only helps fulfill our mission of moving researcher inventions to the public domain as quickly as possible, it also validates the innovative work of Dr. Garwood and his co-inventors at the University’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research.”

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

Related Content

Russian Team Developing New Technology to Significantly Reduce MRI Research Costs
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 16, 2018
January 16, 2018 — Researchers from the NUST MISIS Engineering Center for Industrial Technologies in Russia have deve
Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

Lumbar spine MRI showing disc herniation and nerve root at baseline and one month after treatment

News | Interventional Radiology | January 11, 2018
The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back...
Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Rates of Imaging Positivity for IV-SUDs Complications. Image courtesy of Efren J. Flores, M.D.

News | Clinical Study | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opio
Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and the, C, D, first and, E, F, last examinations performed in contrast group patient 13. Regions of interest used in quantification of signal intensity are shown as dashed lines for globus pallidus (green), thalamus (blue), dentate nucleus (yellow), and pons (red).

News | Contrast Media | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive dec
Hip Steroid Injections Associated with Bone Changes

58-year-old woman with left hip pain. X-ray from one month prior to the steroid/anesthetic injection demonstrates moderate joint space narrowing (arrows) and bony proliferation (arrowheads).

News | Orthopedic Imaging | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Osteoarthritis patients who received a steroid injection in the hip had a significantly greater in
Weight Loss Through Exercise Alone Does Not Protect Knees
News | Orthopedic Imaging | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight can significantly slow down the degeneration
Neurofeedback Shows Promise in Treating Tinnitus

The standard approach to fMRI neurofeedback. Image courtesy of Matthew Sherwood, Ph.D.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — Researchers using...
Male Triathletes May Be Putting Their Heart Health at Risk
News | Cardiac Imaging | January 09, 2018
Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis,...
State-of-the-Art MRI Technology Bypasses Need for Biopsy
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 09, 2018
January 9, 2018 – The most common type of tumor found in the kidney is generally quite small (less than 1.5 in).
Overlay Init