News | Breast Imaging | November 07, 2016

Gamma Medica Announces New Partnership with Henry Ford Health System

Michigan healthcare network will install Gamma Medica’s LumaGEM Molecular Breast Imaging system by the end of 2016

LumaGEM molecular breast imaging system, MBI, Gamma Medica, Henry Ford Health System, RSNA 2016

November 7, 2016 — Gamma Medica announced that Henry Ford Health System (Detroit) has purchased Gamma Medica’s LumaGEM Molecular Breast Imaging system. The system is set to be installed by the end of 2016 at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital. The MBI technology will be offered as a secondary screening and diagnostic tool following X-ray mammography, particularly for women with dense breast tissue. This will help improve cancer detection in women who are at greater risk of developing breast cancer.

Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women, with 40,000 annual breast cancer deaths in the United States alone. Almost 50 percent of women in the U.S. are diagnosed with dense breast tissue. Unfortunately, not only do many not realize they have dense breasts, but they may not understand what it means for their risk of breast cancer. For a woman with dense breasts, there may be cases where a woman received a negative mammogram, but she is later diagnosed with breast cancer. Dense breast tissue and cancer both appear white on mammograms, sometimes making it difficult to distinguish between the two. This can lead to false negatives or delayed diagnoses.

Tailored to dense breast tissue, MBI is a groundbreaking method that significantly improves early diagnosis of breast cancer in women with dense breast tissue. The compression required for MBI is also lighter and far more comfortable than a mammogram.

“Our goal is to give patients the latest, safest and best quality care by continuing to evolve the ways we help our patients and providers be certain in their test results,” said Patricia Miller, M.D., Breast Imaging Center director at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital. “As research and real-world evidence underscore the unique value of MBI to a patient population that critically needs it, we found it important to offer this secondary screening tool. Given the proven significant increase in cancer detection rates through the use of the LumaGEM MBI system, we are confident this installation will help us diagnose breast cancer early, specifically for our patients with dense breast tissue.”

Recent studies have confirmed that MBI highlights metabolic activity in breast tumors not visible on mammograms due to tissue density, leading to earlier diagnosis. Clinical research also shows use of LumaGEM reduces biopsies, often painful and costly, by 50 percent. A retrospective study involving over 1,700 women with dense breast tissue over a three-year period, which was published in the American Journal of Roentgenology’s August issue, confirmed LumaGEM’s high incremental cancer detection rate of 7.7 cancers per thousand (7.7/1000). This compares with published data for primary mammography screening alone of 3/1000. The study also concluded that when MBI was used as a secondary screening modality, the total number of cancers found was approximately 12/1000. Approximately 85 percent of these cancers were also confirmed as invasive and node negative, indicating they were detected at an early stage and therefore presented a better prognosis.

To educate women this year about the importance of MBI and breast density, Gamma Medica launched the Be Certain campaign, which aims to give physicians and women access to the most accurate clinical information on breast density and breast cancer detection. In addition to education, Gamma Medica is committed to increasing the number of accurate early breast cancer screenings through installations at major facilities like Henry Ford.

For more information: www.gammamedica.com

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