Technology | October 16, 2014

Fujifilm SonoSite Upgrades SonoAccess Medical App

Version 2.0 offers customized content, offline access

October 16, 2014 – Fujifilm SonoSite Inc. unveiled version 2.0 of the SonoAccess educational app, a free mobile device application that provides the healthcare community with access to a multimedia library of ultrasound resources including instructional videos, clinical image galleries and a variety of case studies. Fujifilm SonoSite redesigned the app from the ground up based on collaboration from existing users, added more features and workflow improvements and extended its reach to include all Apple and Android phones and tablets.

Within the SonoAccess version 2.0, users can customize a profile to generate a recommended list of content, download any content item for offline access, view the “What’s New” feed to browse through all of the content on the app and use the search functionality to find the content quickly. Additional features include the ability to:

  • Watch ultrasound “How To” videos organized by specialty and product to pick up helpful tips from expert ultrasound users;
  • Watch video case studies for more detailed information on clinical applications of ultrasound;
  • Watch specially created 3-D animation videos which correlate ultrasound findings with anatomy;
  • Access the clinical image gallery to reference and compare to the images you scan;
  • Find reimbursement information and Quick Start user guides for SonoSite systems;
  • Share the app via several social media outlets; and
  • Contact Fujifilm SonoSite from the app to get your questions answered.

 

For more information: www.sonoaccess.com

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