News | Ultrasound Imaging | November 21, 2016

Fujifilm SonoSite Showcases Point-of-Care Ultrasound Portfolio at RSNA 2016

Company will offer live scanning with Vevo MD ultra high frequency ultrasound, demonstration of SonoSite iViz and other models

Fujifilm SonoSite, point-of-care ultrasound, RSNA 2016, SII, X-Porte, iViz, Vevo MD

November 21, 2016 — Fujifilm SonoSite Inc. will present its portfolio of ultrasound solutions and highlight enhanced features and upgrades at the 102nd scientific assembly and annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). RSNA 2016 will be held Nov. 27 – Dec. 2, 2016 in Chicago. 

The following will be on exhibit and available for demonstration:

SonoSite SII — Originally developed for regional anesthesia, vascular access and trauma applications, the SII empowers efficiency for clinicians through a simple, yet smart user interface that adapts to the user's imaging needs. The system is portable and can be used across multiple hospital environments, including a zero-footprint option. The latest version of SII offers improved imaging technology and steep needle profiling. The SII also features DirectClear technology, a novel, patent-pending process that is now available on the rP19c and rC60xi transducers. DirectClear elevates transducer performance by increasing penetration and contrast resolution. Other new enhancements include a larger display with anti-reflection glass, greater storage capacity, updated system ports, an improved stand and armored cabling for durability.

SonoSite X-Porte — This highly portable system incorporates Extreme Definition Imaging (XDI), a proprietary beam-forming technology that pinpoints precision so artifact clutter is dramatically reduced and contrast resolution is greatly enhanced. The system includes a user-friendly customizable touchscreen interface, as well as real-time educational visual guides and tutorials. New features and functionality include additional customized worksheets, as well as the ability to take measurements and calculations on a closed exam.

SonoSite iViz — Advancing Fujifilm's integration of ultrasound with medical IT, iViz was designed with ultra-mobility in mind. It allows seamless access to learning resources and patient information, as well as the ability to store exam findings, submit reports and consult with remote providers for near real-time assessment, making it especially suited for field use and telemedicine. As a next-generation architecture and platform, iViz is the first medical visualization solution, according to Fujifilm, that is enabled for bi-directional electronic medical record (EMR) connectivity through the Synapse VNA (vendor neutral archive). Using this option, iViz accepts patient demographics from the EMR, eliminating manual entry and saving valuable time. With just a few taps, iViz can also send patient reports to the EMR.

Vevo MD — Fujifilm Sonosite calls Vevo MD the world's first ultra high frequency ultrasound system for clinical use. The range of frequencies available (up to 70 MHz) results in image resolution down to 30 micrometers, which is less than half a grain of sand. With Vevo MD, clinicians can see the smallest parts of anatomy, making it an ideal tool for imaging infants, identifying detecting tiny suspicious lesions, or monitoring subtle changes in blood flow in major arteries.

Fujfilm will be performing live model scanning with Vevo MD during RSNA 2016. Due to RSNA restrictions, onsite imaging scans will be limited to the head, neck, upper abdomen and extremities.

For more information: www.fujifilmusa.com/products/medical

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