Technology | April 10, 2007

First Mobile Clinical Assistant Designed for Clinicians

Motion Computing introduced its new C5 mobile clinical assistant (MCA), a new computing category created by Intel with support from Motion to enable nurses, physicians and other clinicians to do their jobs on the move.

The Motion C5, the first product in the MCA category, integrates durable design elements with key point-of-care data and image capture technologies to simplify workflows, ease clinician workloads and improve overall quality of care. Designed based on input from thousands of clinicians worldwide, the C5 brings automated patient data management directly to the point of care. Intel and Motion conducted extensive user level, ethnographic, human factors, time/motion and clinical workflow research. This research resulted in clear requirements for a purpose-built mobile device.

The C5 is the first highly sealed, fully disinfectable computer to integrate into one durable device the relevant technologies important to clinician workflow and productivity. The C5 combines multiple devices into one, including a built-in barcode and RFID reader for patient identification and supply, specimen and medication administration verification; a built-in camera; and a fingerprint reader to improve security and simplify clinician authentication.

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