Technology | July 25, 2014

FDA Clears Philips Ultra Mobile Visiq Ultrasound System

Miniaturized solution increases access to quality diagnostic scans for more OB patients

July 25, 2014 — Philips Healthcare has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its ultra mobile ultrasound system, Visiq, in the U.S. The system is the first Philips ultrasound system to combine the benefits of greater mobility, performance and simplicity into a single miniaturized solution, helping clinicians increase access to quality diagnostic scans for more OB patients.

This ultrasound device can be easily transported wherever care is needed, and its quick-start technology and long battery life make it an ideal system for physician offices, hospitals and other clinical settings.

Visiq's touch-screen gesture controls are familiar to anyone who has used a smartphone or tablet. It allows users to easily capture images, take measurements and share data. In addition, Visiq offers many of the automatic image optimization features found on Philips' premium Epiq system, as well as built-in Wi-Fi for digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data transfer to hospital or cloud-based picture archiving and communication system (PACS).

At the heart of the Visiq system is a smart transducer that fits comfortably into the user's hand. Philips has taken advantage of advances in miniaturization to integrate a sophisticated broadband micro-digital beam former and powerful image acquisition module into the transducer. Visiq targets OB and abdominal applications and lays the foundation for a future range of portable ultrasound products to meet the evolving needs of clinicians and patients.

"Portable and convenient, Visiq is so intuitive, with remarkable, easy-to-use measurement capabilities for maternal-fetal medicine specialists or general obstetricians," said Dr. Michael Ruma, maternal-fetal medicine specialist at Perinatal Associates of New Mexico. "Instead of just listening to the baby's heartbeat, clinicians are able to see the baby in 2-D and color."

For more information: www.philips.com/VISIQ

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