News | May 28, 2009

Elekta Delivers Neuromag MEG System to German Brain Center

May 28, 2009 – The University Hospital at Heinrich-Heine-University in Düsseldorf, Germany, has installed Elekta Neuromag, a device for noninvasive measurement of brain activity using Magnetoencephalography (MEG) technology.

Completely non-invasive and painless, MEG is a powerful tool used for studying normal brain function, as well as brain disorders, such as epilepsy and autism.

The University has been utilizing MEG technology for more than 12 years; however, recently upgraded their Elekta system, allowing researchers to record human brain activity better and more accurately than before.

“After successfully using the old 122-channel Neuromag MEG system for
more than 12 years, I’m extremely excited about the installation of the
technologically-advanced 306-channel system,” says Professor Alfons
Schnitzler, M.D., Ph.D., head, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and
Medical Psychology and Director, Center for Movement Disorders and
Neuromodulation, Heinrich-Heine-University.

Researchers from various departments, such as neurology, clinical
neuroscience, neurosurgery, psychiatry, and experimental psychology will
employ MEG to track brain activity related to sensory, motor, cognitive and emotional functions, at high temporal and spatial resolution, in healthy human subjects, as well as patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders.
“One particular focus,” said Dr. Schnitzler, “will be on the identification and modulation of oscillatory networks involved in normal brain function and their alterations in movement disorders and other neuropsychiatric diseases.”

Dr. Schnitzler also notes that the Center for Movement Disorders and
Neuromodulation at HHU runs a comprehensive program on Deep Brain
Stimulation (DBS). DBS delivers a constant, low electrical stimulation to
the brain through implanted electrodes and is used to help partially
restore normal movements in Parkinson's Disease, tremor syndromes, dystonia and other movement disorders.

“The new MEG system will allow us to record brain activity from patients
with implanted DBS devices and to study mechanisms of DBS and other
neuromodulatory interventions,” continues Schnitzler. “In addition to MEG, state-of-the-art MRI, PET, high-density EEG, and stereotactic TMS
facilities, as well as intracranial recordings are available to complement
the picture obtained from MEG measurements. This combination will provide a unique, non-invasive window through the human skull, offering exciting perspectives for clinical and cognitive neuroscientists and clinicians.”

For more information: www.elekta.com

Related Content

Non-Contrast MRI Effective in Monitoring MS Patients
News | Neuro Imaging | March 18, 2019
Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach...
New MRI Sensor Can Image Activity Deep Within the Brain
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 15, 2019
Calcium is a critical signaling molecule for most cells, and it is especially important in neurons. Imaging calcium in...
Iron Measurements With MRI Reveal Stroke's Impact on Brain

Images show illustrative examples of visual R2? modifications within substantia nigra (SN) at baseline (24-72 h) and follow-up (1 y) in striatum (participants 1 and 2) and control groups (participants 3 and 4). Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Stroke | March 12, 2019
March 12, 2019 — A simple ...
Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Install of Magnetom Sola 1.5T MRI
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 04, 2019
South Texas Radiology Imaging Centers, San Antonio, recently became the first healthcare institution in the United...
Videos | Cardiac Imaging | February 27, 2019
This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient unveiled by Siemens at th
FDA Clears Advancements for Viewray MRIdian Radiation Therapy System
Technology | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | February 21, 2019
February 21, 2019 — ViewRay Inc. received 510(k) clearance from the U.S.
MRI and Computer Modeling Reveals How Wrist Bones Move

Using fast MRI, UC Davis researchers scanned left and right wrists of men and women and used the data to build computer models of the movement of wrist bones. The data could help understand wrist injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Image courtesy of Brent Foster and Abhijit Chaudhari, UC Davis.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 19, 2019
In a just-published Journal of Biomechanics article, the researchers proved a longtime assumption about individuals'...
Siemens Healthineers Demonstrates Artificial Intelligence, Healthcare Digitalization at HIMSS19
News | Artificial Intelligence | February 13, 2019
February 13, 2019 — At the 2019 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) global conference and e
Fujifilm Launches Latest Synapse 3D Version at HIMSS 2019

The new Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MR application in Synapse 3D

Technology | Advanced Visualization | February 08, 2019
Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. will debut the latest version of its Synapse 3D solution at the Healthcare Information...
Study Assesses Risk of MRI Exams for Patients With Tattoos
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 01, 2019
A new European study concluded that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams pose little risk for people with tattoos,...