News | April 20, 2009

Elekta’s Neuromag to Provide Brain Mapping Technology for Research

April 20, 2009 - The Mind Research Network (MRN) has acquired an Elekta Neuromag, a device for noninvasive measurement of brain activity using Magnetoencephalography (MEG) technology. MEG is an imaging technique used to measure the magnetic fields produced by electrical activity in the brain via extremely sensitive devices such as superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). T MRN has been utilizing MEG technology to study brain function and disorders for approximately the last five years; however, the organization will upgrade to the Elekta Neuromag MEG system in early 2009, allowing researchers to record human brain activity better and more accurately than before. "When looking to replace our current MEG system, we chose Elekta because we felt that their data collection software and analysis and archiving of records would meet all of our research and clinical needs," says Michael Weisend, Ph.D., director of MEG/EEG Core at MRN, and expert in identifying and specifically defining the location of epileptic seizures. "We are funded to study a variety of neuroscience areas that will exploit the Elekta Neuromag's capability," says Weisend. "Currently, we investigate the fundamental mechanisms of learning and memory in healthy individuals, as well as those with brain-based disorders such as traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, drug addiction, and schizophrenia. We also are collaborating with Dr. Bruce Fisch, director of the epilepsy treatment program at the University of New Mexico to develop a clinical MEG program. This program will help to guide neurosurgical intervention in people with epilepsy and brain tumors." "With a long-term commitment to the development of MEG technology, Elekta was the natural choice when MRN made its decision to purchase a new MEG system," says Stephen Otto, chairman of Elekta's Neuromag Business. "We are pleased to see an increasing interest around the world for Elekta Neuromag systems, particularly in the U.S. We will continue to develop new features and technological advances so that organizations like MRN can continue to be at the forefront of MEG instrumentation." MEG technology is regarded as the most efficient method for tracking brain activity at millisecond resolution. Compared to EEG technology, MEG has uniquely accurate localization capabilities. Other technologies such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), only provide anatomical or metabolic information; whereas MEG is a direct measure of neuronal electric activity. When complemented with MRI, MEG increases the ability to understand brain activity and improve treatment of functional disorders particularly, epilepsy. For more information: www.elekta.com

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