News | January 02, 2009

Dr. Jennifer Mieres Assumes Duties as New Head of ASNC

January 2, 2008 - Jennifer Mieres, M.D., associate professor of medicine and director of nuclear cardiology at New York University, officially assumed the presidency of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) yesterday with a call to physicians, scientists and technologists to emphasize patient outcomes and restore patient trust in the world of cardiovascular imaging.

Dr. Mieres has long been a champion for patients, said ASNC, and has been a national spokesperson for the American Heart Association's Go Red For Women movement, a campaign that raises awareness of the prevalence of heart disease in women. In addition, she was nominated for an Emmy Award in 2003 for her production of the PBS documentary "A Woman's Heart" and is co-author of the book Heart Smart for Black Women and Latinas (St. Martin's Press 2008).

In a presentation to attendees at ASNC's 2008 Annual Scientific Session, Dr. Mieres renewed her commitment to patients with a call for "responsible imaging", where health care professionals make their best efforts to select the right test for the right patient at the right time.

Dr. Mieres will serve as president of ASNC until 2010.

For more information: www.asnc.org

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