News | Ultrasound Imaging | March 15, 2016

Digisonics Showcases Radiology Workflow Management Tools at AIUM 2016

Highlights include data mining and business analytics tools, reporting software

March 15, 2016 — Digisonics will exhibit its latest enhancements for OB/GYN, general ultrasound, vascular ultrasound and general radiology image management and structured reporting at this year’s American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) annual conference, March 17-21 in New York City. 

Digisonics OB Search, a data mining and business analytics tool, enables users to quickly explore large amounts of data and transform it into valuable information, measuring current and past performance and optimizing future strategic planning. One valuable component of the tool is the ability to generate summary reports for time intervals associated with key workflow events such as the time to schedule a procedure, time to execute an imaging procedure and time to produce a final report. These productivity reports can be run as a function of any field in the database including personnel, site, study type, indications, etc. Administrators will also appreciate the availability of OB Search’s production and efficiency analysis including study volume and turnaround time reports, which are vital for facilities who want to either attain AIUM accreditation or maintain their certification.  

The latest Digisonics software enhancements are designed to reduce human input error, streamline reporting workflow and assist clinicians with meeting current AIUM accreditation requirements. New features include a fetal evaluation form for quick and comprehensive documentation, configurable report sections, default clinical reporting content update following AIUM guidelines and accreditation standards, and enhanced measurement capabilities.

Digisonics’ standards-based and vendor-neutral solutions help facilities maximize efficiency by integrating and automating the entire ultrasound workflow, resulting in faster report turnaround times and improved overall patient care.

For more information: www.digisonics.com

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