News | Ultrasound Imaging | December 09, 2019

DiA Joins with IBM Watson Health to Arm Clinicians with its AI-powered Cardiac Ultrasound Software

DiA’s novel solution leverages AI to transform the way clinicians capture and analyze ultrasound images. By adding DiA to its AI Marketplace, IBM Watson Health will offer clinicians access to objective and accurate ultrasound analysis

DiA’s novel solution leverages AI to transform the way clinicians capture and analyze ultrasound images

December 9, 2019 —  DiA Imaging Analysis Ltd., an IBM Alpha Zone Accelerator Alumni Startup, announces a collaboration with IBM Watson Health, a leading provider of innovative AI, enterprise imaging, and interoperability solutions used by medical professionals worldwide. The IBM Imaging AI Marketplace will offer DiA’s FDA-cleared, AI-powered cardiac ultrasound software, designed to assist clinicians to analyze cardiac ultrasound images automatically.

Analyzing ultrasound images is often a visual process that can be challenging and highly dependent on user experience. DiA’s solutions address this challenge by assisting clinicians to objectively and accurately analyze ultrasound images, reducing the subjectivity associated with visual interpretation.

With the launch of the IBM Imaging AI Marketplace, IBM will be introducing DiA’s LVivo EF solution, one of several cardiology and general imaging AI solutions that the company has developed.  DiA’s LVivo EF application offers clinicians an AI-based quantification solution that will provide automated clinical data such as Ejection Fraction (EF) and Global Longitudinal Strain (GLS). The company anticipates adding additional solutions to the Marketplace in the near future.  

“IBM Watson Health is proud to announce a collaboration with DiA Imaging,” said Anne Le Grand, General Manager, Imaging, Life Sciences and Oncology, IBM Watson Health. “DiA’s innovative AI-powered offerings can provide our clients with the ability to analyze images with advanced AI-based solutions which can support IBM Watson Health’s mission to help build smarter health ecosystems.”

“Our collaboration with IBM Watson Health demonstrates the implementation of DiA’s vision to make the analysis of ultrasound images smarter and accessible to clinicians with various levels of experience, on any platform,” said Hila Goldman-Aslan, CEO and Co- Founder of DiA Imaging Analysis. “We are proud to offer our cross-platform, vendor-neutral solutions to healthcare providers in the IBM Watson Health’s ecosystem, leading the change to help transform ultrasound analysis with AI.”

DiA demonstrated its full suite of LVivo and additional solutions during the Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting in Chicago. DiA’s AI was highlighted and demonstrated at the IBM Watson Health Booth.

For more information: www.dia-analysis.com

Related Content

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Moblie C-arms have seen several advances over the past de
Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S. launch of the SuperSonic MACH 40 ultrasound system, expanding the company’s suite of ultrasound technologies with its first premium, cart-based system.
News | Breast Imaging | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Hologic, Inc. announced he U.S.
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac
A 3-D ultrasound system provides an effective, noninvasive way to estimate blood flow that retains its accuracy across different equipment, operators and facilities, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.

Volume flow as a function of color flow gain (at a single testing site). For each row the color flow c-plane and the computed volume flow are shown as a function of color flow gain. The c-plane is shown for four representative gain levels, whereas the computed volume flow is shown for 12–17 steps across the available gain settings. Flow was computed with (solid circles on the graphs) and without (hollow circles on the graphs) partial volume correction. Partial volume correction accounts for pixels that are only partially inside the lumen. Therefore, high gain (ie, blooming) does not result in overestimation of flow. Systems 1 and 2 converge to true flow after the lumen is filled with color pixel. System 3 is nearly constant regarding gain and underestimates the flow by approximately 17%. Shown are mean flow estimated from 20 volumes, and the error bars show standard deviation. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — A 3-D ultrasound
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

News | Pediatric Imaging | June 29, 2020
June 29, 2020 — A type of smart magnetic r...