News | Breast Density | September 28, 2016

Dense Breast Group Develops Patient Education Resources in Spanish

Spanish, breast health, breast density, DenseBreast-info.org

September 28, 2016 – Addressing the educational needs of an underserved and growing population, DenseBreast-info.org now provides two key Patient resource tools in Spanish, a Breast Cancer Risk Checklist and a Patient Brochure. The website addresses questions women and their healthcare providers often have about breast density – helping them to "Get Smart about Being Dense."

“DenseBreast-info.org, launched in April 2015, has become a valued educational tool to patients, healthcare providers, imaging centers and legislators. Visitors to the website hail from nearly 140 countries and we have received multiple requests to translate website content into other languages,” said DenseBreast-info’s executive

director, JoAnn Pushkin. “In order to expand the reach of the website’s educational offerings, our first step has been translating key material into Spanish. We look forward to continued grant funding and translation of the entire website into Spanish in 2017.”

The Breast Cancer Risk Checklist is designed for download so patients can track their personal risk factors, including breast density. The Patient Brochure provides Fast Facts about density and addresses questions about other common screening tools a patient may be recommended to have.

Breast density notification laws have now been enacted in 27 states, encompassing 68 percent of American women.

These laws require that some level of information about breast density be provided to women after their mammogram but such notification can lead to questions. According to chief scientific advisor, Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, “Forty percent of women of mammography age have dense breasts. Breast density can compromise the effectiveness of a mammogram and screening tests such as ultrasound or MRI, used in addition to mammography, substantially increase detection of early-stage breast cancer in dense breasts. Additionally, breast density increases a woman’s risk for the disease. Information about personal risk factors and breast cancer screening in dense breasts is important for all women to understand; the availability of patient content in Spanish broadens the reach of this educational resource.”

The nonprofit organization’s website was developed by Pushkin, Berg, and Cindy Henke-Sarmento, a woman’s health entrepreneur/mammography technologist. Website material is extensively sourced and is the collaborative effort of breast imaging experts and medical reviewers.

For more information: www.DenseBreast-info.org

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